Courses

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100 Level

 

DCOR 101 Discovery Guidance (1 credit)▼

This course introduces the curriculum overview of the Discovery Program as well as its components. The following items are introduced: 1) A variety of courses and the expertise of faculty members for the Discovery Track, 2) Ten Faculties where they can complete their Senior Project for the Matching Track.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DCOR 159 Introduction to Writing and Research Skills (1 credit)▼

Introduction to the skills needed to complete independent research projects. Course content includes (1) identifying appropriate academic sources, both in print and online, (2) effectively summarizing and paraphrasing sources, (3) using quotations and citing works properly, and (4) creating a bibliography.

  • Prerequisite: 3rd year or above
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DCUL 110 Cross-Cultural Experiences (1 credit)▼

You can discover a new world when you step out of familiar surroundings by participating in cross-cultural settings. Whether traveling abroad or spending time with new people, you experience firsthand a way of life that you are not aware of. In this course, you will learn how to understand and negotiate different cultural systems.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 120 Global Sociology: Understanding Diversity (1 credit)▼

This is an introductory course on sociology. In this course, students will learn basic concepts such as socialization, social interaction, networks and institutions, conformity and deviance, and stratification and inequality. The goal of this course is to explore “diversity” by using these sociological concepts.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 130 Health and Culture (1 credit)▼

This is an introductory course on medical anthropology, which a subfield of anthropology that tries to understand health and illnesses from cross-cultural perspective. We ask questions such as: Are brain dead individuals really “dead”? Is a fetus a “person”? Is a parasite part of our body? Is shamanism a hoax? Through such questions, we re-consider categories such as life/death, body/mind, health/illness, and self/society via cross-cultural examinations of medical beliefs.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 140 Current Political Events (1 credit)▼

The Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) of Japan has recently decided to extend the term limit of its presidents. Given that the LDP has been the largest party in the Diet, this change means that the same person can serve not only as the LDP president but also as the prime minister of the entire country longer than before. What do you think about how the prime minister is chosen in Japan? Do you think he/she should be directly elected by the people? Why? What are the possible pros and cons of direct election of the prime minister? By exploring these questions, this course will help you understand one aspect of the system of democracy in Japan and think about the relationship between political leaders and citizens more in general.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DSIE 130 Giving and Volunteering (1 credit)▼

This course examines patterns and motivations of charitable giving and volunteering across countries. Students will learn about the important role of giving and volunteering in a global context and gain exposure to the diverse practices of and responses to charity and philanthropy across countries. Students will also be given opportunities to reflect on their own motives for giving and volunteering, and consider how their motivations reflect or diverge from broader cultural trends.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAKA YOSHIOKA

DSCI 110 Introductory Mathematics (1 credit)▼

This is an introductory course in mathematics which will cover subjects including algebra, trigonometry, logarithm, probability and statistics.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR & JIAN TANG

DSCI 115 Fundamentals of Mathematics (1 credit)▼

In this course, we teach mathematics on complex numbers, linear algebras, series, calculus, and probability. Topics covered include: Complex numbers and Euler’s form, vectors and tensors, matrices and determinants, Series and limits, Differentials and integrals, and Probability and statistics.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 120 Introductory Physics (1 credit)▼

This is a remedial course on physics including mechanics, thermal physics, wave phenomena, optics, electricity and magnetism, and atomic and nuclear physics, required for students at the pre-college level in Japan. Course content may vary depending on student needs.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 125 Fundamentals of Physics (1 credit)▼

In this course, students will learn college-level physics with limited use of mathematics. The emphasis will be on the concepts and principles of classical physics together with the historical origins for the ideas. Contents include mechanics (linear and angular momentum, kinetic and potential energy, conservation of momentum and energy), thermal physics and thermodynamics (enthalpy and entropy), oscillator and wave, electricity and magnetism, geometrical and wave optics.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 130 Introductory Chemistry (1 credit)▼

This course introduces the core concepts and principles in chemistry at a foundation level. Topics that may be covered are: Matter, elements, atoms and ions, atomic and electronic structure, bonding and molecular structure, intermolecular associations, states of matter, gas laws, solutions, and acids and bases.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 135 Fundamental Chemistry (1 credit)▼

Studies in fundamental chemistry deal with a range of fundamental concepts that can be used to explain various phenomena in chemistry, materials science and biology. The courses have been designed to provide students who have an interest in chemistry with the necessary knowledge and skills to undertake further studies in chemistry or pursue alternative pathways in the biological, environmental, earth and physical sciences. Fundamental chemistry focuses in the areas of stereochemistry, synthesis, properties and reactions of molecules, thermodynamics, kinetics and the principles of organic chemistry.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor: UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 145 Fundamentals of Earth Science (1 credit)▼

This is an introductory course focusing on Earth and Planetary Sciences. Topics include formation of planets, evolution of planetary atmosphere, geochemistry of the Earth’s continental crust, and human impact on the environment.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KATSUYUKI YAMASHITA

DSCI 155 Basic Biology (1 credit)▼

TBA

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): MICHIHIRO SUGA

200 Level

 

DCOR 201 Discovery Seminar I (1 credit)▼

Discovery Seminar I will explore what it means to learn in a university setting among a diverse group of people. Inter-cultural communications, team building, information literacy, constructive criticism, and mutual respect will be covered.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG, YUAN YUAN GONG, HARUNA MIYAGAWA, TAK UESUGI 

DCOR 202 Discovery Seminar II (1 credit)▼

The aim of Discovery Seminar II is to enable students to think critically. We live in a dynamic global society where each day we are confronted with new events, information, facts, and problems. In order to form an opinion about these issues we must learn to identify and analyse crucial information. This course will help students to evaluate issues from diverse perspectives. The course will be taught by multiple instructors each with a specialisation in diverse fields of non-profits, management, economics, and political science.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR, KIMIKO OSAWA, JIAN TANG, AZTAKA YOSHIOKA

DCOR 203 Discovery Seminar III (1 credit)▼

Discovery Seminar III will be taken concurrently with your Senior Project (DCOR 699). It is a year-long course in which Discovery students who are studying in different academic disciplines and departments come together and share their experience. It is also an occasion for you to prepare for your Senior Project presentation.

  • Prerequisite: DCOR 201, DCOR 202
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DCOR 251 Introduction to Composition (1 credit)▼

Introduction to formality levels in different modes of written language including texting, email, essays, and online writings. Basics of academic writing, including an overview of discipline-specific patterns in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences, will also be covered.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): IAN NAKAMURA

DCOR 252 Composition Skills (1 credit)▼

Application of writing patterns introduced in DCOR 251 through essay-length assignments. Introduction to editing strategies for self-correction. Key issues in academic writing, including the ethical integration of outside sources, will also be addressed.

  • Prerequisite: DCOR 251 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): IAN NAKAMURA

DCOR 255 Interdisciplinary Reading Skills ESL (0.5 credit)▼

Development of academic reading skills needed to successfully complete English-medium content courses in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Students will improve reading comprehension through strategies such as skimming for general meaning, scanning for specific information, and understanding meaning through context.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): IAN NAKAMURA

DCUL 210 Cultural Anthropology (1.5 credits)▼

What do anthropologists do? Can you define the term “anthropology?” In this course, we will learn some basics of this discipline?study of human-beings?by focusing on cultural aspects. We will examine other cultures as well as our own using comparative and reflective reference points.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 211 Peoples of Japan (1.5 credits)▼

By deconstructing the assumed homogenous concept of “Japanese people,” we will investigate diverse populations and cultures in Japan. We will critically analyze one of the most frequently used notions of “culture” in anthropology as well.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 216 Korean Diaspora (1.5 credits)▼

Through the lens of Korean diasporic communities around the world, we will learn about sending countries, migration and its implications, ethnic communities, and host societies.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 220 Introduction to Social Inquiry (1.5 credits)▼

In this course, students will learn the basic concepts and research methods in social sciences. We explore what roles research methods play in generating scientific knowledge, and why they are integral components of social science research. Through an introduction to qualitative and quantitative methods, students will learn how to turn simple wonders into scientific inquiries. Students will also learn about the ethics of conducting research.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 221 Family in Motion (1.5 credits)▼

Family is a place of nurturance and conflict. It is a fundamental institution in modern society where customs are passed down from one generation to the next, and privileges and inequalities are reproduced in everyday life. By engaging with the empirical research on macro-structural changes involved in globalization, we will explore how these events have transformed the meanings and practices of family, and how society in turn is influenced by the changing nature of family.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 226 Aging in Globalized World (1.5 credits)▼

Humans go through various stages of life. In each stage, individuals are given various roles by society, some of which are founded on biological differences while others are “socially constructed.” These ways of defining roles often weld into each other, solidifying the roles to create a stable society. Yet the notion of stability is often questioned. This course will explore how aging and events throughout one’s life course are changing with time and space.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 231 Environmental Anthropology (1.5 credits)▼

This is an introductory course on environmental anthropology. We ask questions such as: How are our beliefs about nature and culture related? Why do different cultures have different ethical beliefs regarding nature, and how are international agreements built on contested issues such as whale hunting? How are industrial pollution, pesticides and genetic modification technologies altering the relationship between humans and nature?

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 233 Anthropology of Disaster (1.5 credits)▼

Disasters such as the Tohoku earthquake of 2011 can force wide social transformations. How are “disasters” described by the media? How is “reconstruction” organized? By examining various frictions that may emerge between actors such as victims, volunteers, journalists, government and military, we explore cultural, political, and economic issues that emerge out of disasters.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 236 Anthropology of Food (1.5 credits)▼

What food tastes good to you? What food do you find risky? What food sends your imagination to your bygone childhood, or to exotic lands? Study of cultural dimension of food allows us to explore how perceptions and sentiments such as taste, risk, and nostalgia are culturally conditioned. In this course we will study how such ephemeral experiences are also entangled with global economy and power structure.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 238 Energy and Society (1.5 credits)▼

From depletion of fossil fuel to global warming, bleak prospects for the global energy situation have given rise to many new energy alternatives including solar, biomass, and geothermal energy. Such technological developments also have implications for the society by reorganizing labor, human habitation, as well as aesthetic sensibility of the consumers. In this course we will explore the relationship between forms of energy sources and the types of society they engender.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 240 Introduction to Politics (1.5 credits)▼

Politics is everywhere. Whether you like it or not, it affects you and you affect it. As such, it is imperative for any citizen of a political community to understand how politics works and why it works in the ways it does. This is an introductory course to the study of politics. You will learn a systematic way of analyzing it by learning the concepts and methods of political science. Starting with the discussion of what politics is, this course examines fundamental building blocks of political systems such as states, regime types, governing institutions, electoral systems, political ideologies and cultures as well as major actors such as political parties and interest groups.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DCUL 241 Populism (1.5 credits)▼

In this course, we will examine the phenomena called populism by situating it in a larger context of democracy. Does populism endanger democracy? Is it a manifestation of manipulation of ignorant people by political leaders? We are going to analyze these questions both theoretically and empirically. By analyzing populism, you will be able to deepen your understanding about democracy, political leaders, and the roles of citizens, including yourselves, in the process of democracy.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DCUL 242 Politics of Local Government: The Case of Okayama (1.5 credits)▼

While many studies of politics focus on the level of nation-states, politics can be also found at local levels (region, prefecture, town, village, etc.). In this course, we are going to examine the theories and case studies dealing with the relationship between the central government and local governments around the world with a particular focus on Japan. In the latter half of the course, we will examine the case of Okayama (either prefecture or city) to understand how politics works in the community we currently live in. By taking this course, you will become able to understand different ways in which political entities are organized within one country and how politics works at local levels, in particular in Okayama.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DSIE 210 Introduction to Microeconomics (1.5 credits)▼

Some of us face questions like “Why are rents higher in some cities? What price should I charge for the English lessons that I give? How many years should I spend in school? Should I take up a part-time job?” This course will help answer such questions through basic economic concepts. Introduction to Microeconomics will explain the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, including both consumers and producers within the economic system. Important topics include supply and demand, trade theory, elasticity, externalities and firm behavior.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSIE 215 Introduction to Macroeconomics (1.5 credits)▼

Macroeconomics is the study of the whole economy. The goal of macroeconomics is to explain theories and phenomena such as booms and recessions, unemployment, inflation etc. that affect all households, firms and markets in the economy. This course will help students understand the reasons behind changing prices, the differences in income levels across countries, how governments promote a rise in incomes and stabilize employment. The important topics include GDP and its measurement, Consumer Price Index, Unemployment, Banks and Money Supply, Money Growth and Inflation.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSIE 230 Comparative Global Perspectives on Nonprofits, Volunteering, and Giving (1.5 credit)▼

In this course, students will explore the size, scope, and roles of nonprofits, volunteering, and giving across countries, and understand the diverse forms of philanthropic action. In addition, students will learn about the relationships and dynamics between the government, nonprofits, and businesses in a global context. Students will also study theoretical explanations for philanthropic action from political, sociological, and economic perspectives.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAKA YOSHIOKA

DSCI 210 Mathematics for Physical Chemistry (1.5 credits)▼

This course will introduce students to various basic mathematical methods used in physical chemistry. The methods involve error analysis, probability and statistics, linear algebra, vectors and matrices, first and second order differential equations and their solution.

  • Prerequisites: DSCI 115 or permission of instructor.
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 220 Modern Physics (1.5 credits)▼

In this course, students will learn college-level physics with moderate use of mathematics. The emphasis will be on the concepts and principles of modern physics. Contents include electromagnetic wave, relativity, quantum theory, atom and molecule, and nucleus and elementary particle.>/p>

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 115 and DSCI 125 or permission of instructor (DSCI 135 recommended)
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 230 Chemistry for Chemical Engineering (1.5 credits)▼

Chemistry for Chemical Engineers provides background in the topics of mass and energy balances specific to chemical engineering. This course will help students understand the chemical reactions and relate them to the main themes of mass and energy balances.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 135 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 255 Genetics and Molecular Biology (1.5 credits)▼

TBA

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 155 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): AKIRA SATO

DSCI 260 Introduction to Agricultural Sciences (1.5 credits)▼

In this course, students will learn about current issues related to food supply, bio-resources, bio-technology, and conservation of the environment. This course also introduces the basics of agricultural science and other related scientific fields that can be applied to resolve these problems.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KENJI INAGAKI

300 Level

 

DCUL 310 Fieldwork and Ethnography (2 credits)▼

You will learn the basics of fieldwork, conduct your own research, and present your findings.

  • Prerequisites: DCUL 210 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 312 Film and Literature (2 credits)▼

We will deepen and widen our understanding of Japanese society through film and literature.

  • Prerequisite: Three of DCUL or DSIE 2xx ~ 400 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 316 Popular Cultures (2 credits)▼

What kind of popular cultures are you familiar with? In this course we will pay special attention to contemporary pop cultures. We may investigate celebrity, fashion, music, theatre, literature, anime (Japanese animation), video game, and/or manga (Japanese graphic novels and comics) that are created and consumed in Japan and beyond. We will compare these cultural products and analyze their relationship to various social phenomena in larger contexts.

  • Prerequisite: Three of DCUL or DSIE 2xx ~ 400 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 320 Contemporary Migration in Global Perspective (2 credits)▼

Often coupled with the question of rights, migration draws not only academic interests but political and economic interests. This course will explore the issues of migration primarily from a sociological perspective, supplemented by the perspectives of social demography, economics, and public policy. Students will be introduced to theories that attempt to explain why people migrate (and why others stay), where they head to (and where they avoid), why they stay at the destination (and why others return), and how they create a new “home” while being connected to their origin. The course will also explore how the act of migration and the presence of migrants challenge the existent norms and values as well as social institutions such as family, school, and legal system. Throughout the course, we will draw upon various case studies around the world.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 321 Urban Sociology (2 credits)▼

An urban setting is a site of human actions, interactions, and inactions. They occur in the structures of society that are bound not only by physical space but by class, gender, race, and ethnicity. In this course, we will explore how history and culture interact with a place and define the rhythm of life using empirical studies from the USA as well as Japan. We will focus specifically on some areas within Setouchi Region and examine how people navigate their daily life.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 327 History of Social Thought (2 credits)▼

In this course, students will be introduced to philosophers and theorists from the past and present. We will draw insights from social sciences (e.g. sociology, history, etc.) as well as arts such as architecture, literature, and paintings. Thinkers we will refer to may range from Plato and Lao Tzu to the contemporaries such as Edward Said, Arundhati Roy, D.T. Suzuki, and Francisco Romero.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 220 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 330 Medical Anthropology (2 credits)▼

With increased global movements, healthcare workers today frequently face the “problem” of cultural differences. Medical anthropologists attempt to make sense of different medical beliefs and explore the possibility of cultural translation. We also examine how social structures and cultural beliefs also affect the reality of illnesses and well-beings. Topics covered are: Medical belief systems, illness narrative, structural violence, social suffering, life, death and personhood, biosociality, global health, transcultural psychiatry, and environmental health.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 337 History of Science (2 credits)▼

In this class, students will learn about the basic concepts in philosophy, history and sociology of science. Through the discussion of concrete historical accounts of scientific discoveries, we will explore what distinguishes a scientist from a mad person or a sorcerer, scientific knowledge from witchcraft or art, and how scientific knowledge influences society today.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 340 Comparative Politics (2 credits)▼

This course examines how politics works in different countries, trying to understand why we see similarities and differences in their political processes and dynamics. For example, we will discuss varieties we can find in democracies, non-democracies, welfare systems, relationships between politics and religion, types of political parties, and patterns of citizens’ political participation. As the factors that can produce similarities and differences among countries, this course examines regime types, political institutions, cultural and ideational factors, and major political organizations and actors such as political parties, bureaucracy, courts, interest groups, and social movements. While there are some overlaps of topics with Introduction to Politics, this course will examine these topics more in more depth and with analysis of different countries as cases.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DCUL 344 Japanese Politics (2 credits)▼

This course will examine how Japanese politics works in depth. We will examine the history of Japanese politics since the Meiji Restoration, the major actors, organizations, institutions, and dynamics of post-war Japanese politics, and current political events and policies. As we analyze why Japanese politics works as it does, you will be also introduced to the concepts and theories of political science that can help us understand the case of Japanese politics.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DCUL 346 International Politics (2 credits)▼

This course examines dynamics and mechanisms of international politics. By focusing on the question of how actors, within sets of institutions, interact with each other, we will discuss puzzles of international politics such as why countries engage in wars, why there are civil wars and terrorism, why countries engage in international trade in certain ways, and why countries care about international human rights and global environment.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DSIE 310 Microeconomics II (2 credits)▼

Building on Introduction to Microeconomics (DSIE 210), this course will help students understand the decisions made by producers and consumers in different market structures like monopolies, oligopolies, competitive markets. For e.g.: “How is the market for oil different from the market for diamonds?” Other topics covered would be design of the tax system, theory of consumer choice and asymmetric information.

  • Prerequisite: TBA
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSIE 313 Development Economics (2 credits)▼

Over a billion people survive on less than a dollar a day. These in turn constitute the malnourished, illiterate, unemployed and unorganized labor as poverty severely limits people’s capabilities and well-being. This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the problems that developing countries face and the diversity in the developing world. The course will be based on the Human Capital approach to development and will focus on the economics of the central issues in the developing world today like poverty, population, child mortality, hunger, migration and environmental degradation etc. Students will learn the nature and causes of these problems and the appropriate policy design to address them.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSIE 315 Macroeconomics II (2 credits)▼

Applying the basic concepts studied in Introduction to Macroeconomics (DSIE 215), this course delves deeper into economy-wide issues like “How should governments fight recessions? How are inflation and unemployment related?” Exchange rates, financial systems, balance of payments, government debt, monetary and fiscal policies are some of the topics included.

  • Prerequisite: TBA
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSIE 317 Japanese Economy I/II (1 credit ea.)▼

This course presents an overview of the Japanese economy. It will discuss some of the past and present features, persistent problems and challenges faced by this economy. Japan’s post war high growth rate, national income and savings, the lifelong employment system, current unemployment and irregular employment trends, Abenomics, current demographic challenges and sluggish growth rate, high public debt are some of the topics to be included.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KEN AOO

DSIE 330 Nonprofit Management and Governance (2 credits)▼

This course covers nonprofit governing boards and executives as well as management topics such as leadership, strategic management, and collaboration. First, students will understand how the role and functions of nonprofit governing boards and executives differ from those in the public and for-profit sectors. Second, students will examine the relationship between governing boards and executives in nonprofits. Third, students will become familiar with organizational theories and behavior as well as theories of leadership and leadership styles as they apply in nonprofits. Fourth, students will learn strategic management and organizational planning, including ways to identify, assess, and formulate appropriate strategies. Finally, students will explore networks, partnerships, and collaborative activity between nonprofits, the government, and businesses in achieving organizational missions.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 130 or DSIE 230
  • Instructor(s): TAKA YOSHIOKA

DSIE 350 Survey Methods (2 credits)▼

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the survey process, including the development of survey objectives, questionnaire design, survey execution, and analysis of the survey data. Through this course, students will learn how to design and implement mail surveys and web surveys.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 220 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): TAKA YOSHIOKA

DSIE 355 Basic Statistical Methods (2 credits)▼

This course introduces students to descriptive and inferential statistics often used in social science. The course aims to provide students with a solid foundation for analyzing data, and conveying analyses in convincing and appropriate ways. Topics covered include measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability and probability distributions, random variables, hypothesis testing and confidence intervals, statistical power, correlation, simple regression, and an introduction to multivariate regression. Students will use SPSS or Stata (a statistical software application) to develop their data analysis skills.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 220 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): TAKA YOSHIOKA

DSCI 310 Elementary Mathematical Science (1 credit)▼

This course introduces the basic concepts and principles of single variable calculus using concrete examples and applications. The topics covered are: differentiation and integration, limits and continuity of functions and elementary properties of real numbers.

  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Instructor(s): FUTOSHI HAYASAKA, TORU SASAKI, TAKASHI ISHIHARA

DSCI 315 Elementary Statistical Science (1 credit)▼

The occurrence of any phenomena in both the natural and social environment display a certain extent of chance fluctuation. Statistics provides methods for extracting useful information from data with such fluctuations. This course explains the concepts and basic methods of statistics, such as probability and sampling distribution, statistical inference (estimation and test), and statistical analysis.

  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Instructor(s): WATARU SAKAMOTO

DSCI 320 Atomic Physics (1 credit)▼

Atoms are observed through atomic spectra, which can be described by the energy levels of atoms with the use of quantum mechanics. In this course, students will learn the general principles of quantum mechanics, energy levels for hydrogen atom and multi-electron atoms, and atomic spectra.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 325 Molecular Structures (1 credit)▼

Molecular structures or geometric shapes are determined by the molecular bonds, which result from the molecular electronic structures. Molecules with various structures are classified into several types. Accordingly, several types of energy levels are shown for the molecular rotational and vibrational motions in the electronic states. In this course, students will learn point group theory, and different types of electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels for various molecular structures.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSIE 331 Introduction to Catalytic Chemistry (1 credit)▼

This introductory course in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis will examine a number of catalytic reactions and their mechanism and process conditions. It will cover the preparation of catalysts and their use in specific chemical processes. Students will also learn how to analyse the data obtained from a catalytic reaction and how it can be used to determine the mechanism.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 333 Instrumental Analysis (1 credit)▼

The course will address the fundamental principles and applications of modern instrumental analysis relevant for chemical engineering and industrial chemistry. The subject consists of a series of interrelated lectures and tutorials. The analytical techniques covered in this course will range from spectroscopy, chromatography, electro-analytics, thermal analysis, to mass spectrometry. The lecture components will address the underpinning physical principles of each analytical technique in-detail and also include an introduction to statistical data analysis. At the completion of the course, the student will have developed a firm understanding of the analytical methods employed in his or her field of study and also gained experience in carrying out analytical experiments.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 335 Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry (1 credit)▼

This is an introductory course on physical chemistry. Physical chemistry aims to understand the structures and properties of materials, compounds, molecules, etc. using the knowledge of physics. In particular, physical chemistry is essential for developing and interpreting the modern techniques used in determining the structure and properties of new synthetic materials. The topics covered include: atomic and molecular quantum mechanics, thermodynamics, kinetics theories, phase equilibrium, and electrochemistry.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YOSHIKAZU KAMESHIMA, YUTAKA TAKAGUCHI

DSCI 337 Introduction to Environmental Chemistry (1 credit)▼

Chemical industry has contributed to riches and comforts of today’s life; but their products have also induced serious environmental problems. It is imperative, therefore, to understand chemical properties of materials for the construction of sustainable society. This course explores the relationship between materials used in everyday life such as plastics and ceramics and environmental issues from the perspective of chemistry. In addition, environmental topics such as acid rain, ozone hole, and waste recycling will also be introduced.

  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KUNIO KIMURA, TOKURO NANBA

DSCI 341/342 Civil Engineering I/II (1 credit/ea.)▼

In order for our civil life to be safe and comfortable, it is highly important to build and maintain an environmentally friendly urban system and infrastructures that are resistant to natural disasters. In this course, students will learn about the fundamental knowledge of civil and environmental engineering necessary for sustainable development of our society and the national land. (*It is recommended that Civil Engineering I and II are both taken, but taking one or the other is also permitted)

  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KAZUSHI KIMOTO, BYEONGSU KIM, KEISUKE YOSHIDA, SEIJI HASHIMOTO, HIDEAKI NAGARE

DSCI 350 Basic Physics Laboratory (1 credit)▼

TBA

  • Prerequisites: TBA
  • Instructor(s): MICHINOBU MINO

DSCI 353/354 Laboratory in Analytical Chemistry 1/2 (1 credit ea.)▼

This laboratory course in analytical chemistry aims to provide basic knowledge and skills for conducting chemical experiments. Analytical chemistry is composed of qualitative and quantitative characterization of substances. In this course, students will learn various methods for measuring substances and biological materials at molecular level. Furthermore, students will learn the skills for safety management of chemical substances, which are indispensable in further research in the third and fourth years including the research for Senior Project.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

DSCI 355/356 Laboratory in Biology 1/2 (1 credit ea.)▼

Through a series of observation and analysis, students will understand the basics of structures and functions of plants, animals, and microbes. The subjects dealt in this laboratory course includes: 1. Observation of mammalian oocyte, 2. Observation of external and internal plant morphology, 3. Experiment on insects – collection and specimen, 4. Field research on suburban forest, 5. Observation of plant genetics, 6. Plant growth analysis, 7. Observation of gastrointestinal and fermentation microbes, 8. Observation of hemocytes.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

DSCI 357/358 Basic Field Practice 1/2 (1 credit ea.)▼

This course deals with the basic practical training of agriculture at the Field Science Center including Okayama Farm, Tsudaka Livestock Farm, and Hachihama Farm. Students will experience the work in the agricultural field, and learn a basic cultivation and animal feeding techniques of field crops, horticultural crops, and beef cattle. This course also enhances the development of student’s skills in farm work.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

DSCI 360 Introduction to Agrochemical Bioscience (1 credit)▼

Agricultural Bioscience originated from a branch of applied sciences mainly specialized in processing raw agricultural products into foods and beverages. Now this branch has extended its applications to fields such as medical innovations and the improvement of natural environment in accordance with the advancement of modern civilization. In this course, students will learn topics and stories related to the Agricultural Bioscience, which has contributed to human society especially in the field of health, food, and environment. Students will also learn the wealth of organic chemistry and biochemistry, by which novel biological functions are elucidated with rationale and logics of science.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

DSCI 370 Introduction to Environmental Ecology (1 credit)▼

The goal of this course is to understand fundamental concepts of sustainable agricultural production and environmental conservation from the viewpoints of ecology, engineering, and socio-economics. The course provides topics related to the following fields of study: Physiological Plant Ecology, Forest Ecology, Environmental Soil Science, Conservation of Aquatic Biodiversity, Insect Ecology, Evolutionary Ecology, Bioproduction Systems Engineering, Resources Management, and Farm Management Systems and Information Processing.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KEIJI SAKAMOTO

DSCI 381/382 Applied Plant Science I/II (1 credit ea.)▼

This course offers an introductory lecture series regarding the production of both crops and horticulture crops. It deals with following topics: characterization and genetic improvement of useful crop traits, diseases and immunity mechanisms in plants, cultivation management techniques for maximum production, and technologies for transportation and preservation of farm harvests.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

DSCI 390 Introduction to Animal Science (1 credit)▼

The goal of this course is to understand fundamentals of animal science including physiology, anatomy, reproduction, breeding, genetics, nutrition, and microbiology. The course also introduces animal biotechnology, animal model for human diseases, assisted reproductive technology, and relation between food and human health. The student will learn overview of current status of animal science and related issues.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

400 Level

 

DCUL 410 Life History (2 credits)▼

In this course, you will learn life history and its techniques. Narrators of the life history can come from a variety of class, ethnic, racial, social, and geographic backgrounds. Contents may cover childhood and growing-up experiences; education and employment; family, identity, relationships, and community.

  • Prerequisite: Four of DCUL or DSIE 2xx ~ 4xx or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 413 Sex Work and Emotional Labor (2 credits)▼

This course introduces the theoretical notions of “sex work” and “emotional labor” (managing emotion of self and others), examines lives of sex workers, emotional laborers, and their customers in depth, and investigates intersections of sex work and emotional labor. It emphasizes critical analyses of the historical, structural, and social contexts. We will pay special attention to race/ethnicity/nationality, gender, religion, and/or class. This course requires an open mindedness. Capacity to discuss taboo issues and evaluate social biases as well as our own biases is also crucial.

  • Prerequisite: Four of DCUL or DSIE 2xx ~ 4xx or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 416 Visual Sociology (2 credits)▼

Visual sociology is both a method and a theory course that examines how people “see.” Influenced by our position in society, our optical senses and interpretations of phenomena at hand conspire together to form visual perceptions. Such perceptions also define who we are. Visual sociology offers concepts to analyze visual products critically. Using insights gained in this course, students will conduct their own visual project with a sociological sensitivity.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 220 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 419 Anthropology of the Self (2 credits)▼

Violence, destitution, isolation, and oppression often contribute to mental health problems. In this course, we will explore how different notions of the self and individual’s relationship to society affect the ways in which illnesses and well-beings are defined and experienced. Topics covered in this course may include: trauma, depression, adolescent social withdrawal (hikikomori), “sick society”, and transcultural psychiatry.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 330 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 421 Globalization and Development (2 credits)▼

International development is neither neutral nor innocent. Taking a critical approach to the world of international development, this course explores the premises and goals of various actors involved in development projects through case studies. We will focus on the narratives of international development, and underlying forces that impact development and its unintended consequences on the lives of people. Professionals in the field of international development may be invited as guest lecturers.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 320 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 423 Gender in Global Context (2 credits)▼

Gender, as with race and ethnicity, is a social construct. In this course, students will explore how gender plays out in the lives of both sexes and interacts with other aspects of our identity, reinforcing our social roles and positions in society. Through memoirs and biographies of both women and men, we will examine how gender influences pursuits of individuals with a critical look into the socioeconomic and political context. The goal of this course is to contextualize gender as we explore how women and men interpret their circumstances, negotiate challenges they face, and make various life decisions.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 320 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 426 Ethnicity, Sexuality, and Class (2 credits)▼

We analyze social issues at the intersection of multiple variables, such as class, gender, and ethnicity.

  • Prerequisite: Four of DCUL or DSIE 2xx ~ 4xx or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 428 Anthropology of Memory (2 credits)▼

This course is about memory and community in relation to traumatic experiences of violence and exodus. By exploring the intersection of psychological discourse and literary/ethnographic works on trauma we ponder upon the question of justice and responsibility for past atrocities.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 330 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 431 Environment and Ethics (2 credits)▼

Threats of industrial chemicals and nuclear materials on human health and the environment have become significant topics of social justice. How do environmental catastrophes take shape and become recognized by each society? What kinds of cases lead to mass grievance? What are the legal, cultural and institutional instruments that enable or obstruct the pursuit of justice? Through case studies of various environmental catastrophes, we will explore the relationship between justice and knowledge.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 337 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 433 Body and Mind (2 credits)▼

We will explore the body, mind, and their relationship.

  • Prerequisite: Four of DCUL or DSIE 2xx ~ 4xx or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 435 Migration and Health (2 credits)▼

Today, movements of people occur at unprecedented rate. Technological development, increased trade, and mass media have rendered foreign lands much more accessible to many people. This interconnectedness, in turn, has increased conflicts and exploitation around the world engendering new issues such as medical crises among refugees, global organ trade, global epidemics, and medical tourism. Human movements also challenge the capacity of local health care providers and services. We will explore the questions of human rights and global justice with a particular focus on the differential impacts of migration on health by gender, race, and ethnicity.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 320 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 437 Science and Law (2 credits)▼

Most societies have some means of delivering justice based on certain forms of evidence; but what counts as evidence differs vastly in each society. Scientific evidence has become one of the most privileged forms of evidence in courts of law in many countries. Nonetheless, which scientific evidence should be admitted in courtroom still comes under heated debate. In this class, we will explore how scientific evidence is used in court cases and government regulations. The topics covered in this course may include: DNA fingerprinting technology, toxic tort litigations, and environmental regulations.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 337 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 440 Nation-State (2 credits)▼

In today’s world, we often refer to the politics of a given “country,” such as “politics of Japan.” But what is this thing called “country”? The entity we casually call as “country” can be in fact more precisely named as “nation-state.” In this course, we will examine the concept and realities of nation-state by exploring histories and theories of its development. We will also discuss if a nation-state is the most desirable way of dividing human beings into political groups. We are going to discuss real-world examples that pertain to these questions, such as the Brexit and the rise of nationalist far-right parties in various parts of the world.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DCUL 441 Democracy (2 credits)▼

In this course, we will examine democracy as a political system in depth. Questions we are going to discuss include: Is democracy better than non-democracy? Is direct democracy better than representative democracy? Why is distrust in existing political parties increasing in established democracies? Should we pursue deliberative democracy? Is populism a pure form of democracy or a threat to democracy? By taking this course, you can gain deeper understandings of democracy not only as an abstract idea but also as a set of practices that can be adopted in real world politics and that have significant effects on how we live our lives.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DCUL 443 Politics and Gender (2 credits)▼

How do gender norms and gendered roles of men and women influence politics and vice versa? In this course, we are going to explore this question by examining such issues as: women and men as political actors and leaders, how policies can influence men and women differently, and if it is necessary to increase female politicians to improve women’s status and situations. By taking this course, you can deepen your understandings of politics by realizing the powerful influence of gender on political processes and dynamics. You can also deepen your understandings of gender by realizing how gender norms and roles in our everyday lives can be constructed and contested by and in political processes.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DCUL 445 Conducting Research in Political Science (2 credits)▼

This course will help you learn how to write a research paper in the field of political science. Starting from the discussion of what a research paper is, this course will help you find topics for research, develop research questions, review the existing studies, collect and analyze the data, develop your arguments, and write the research design. Although the course can be useful for the students who do not focus on politics as their target of research, you will be asked to choose political events and phenomena as your topics.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 240 or permission of instructor. 
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DSIE 411 International Business (2 credits)▼

International business refers to a wide range of business activities undertaken across national borders. Markets for products and services are worldwide; suppliers and competitors are spread all across the globe and competing effectively requires an understanding of the international dimensions of business. The problems encountered in international business operations are often different from those experienced locally due to economic, political, legal and cultural differences across nations. In this course, students will learn the basic concepts, processes and strategies of International Business, to evaluate the complex environment facing them, understand the mechanism of Foreign Investments, and the operational management of such businesses within a cross cultural environment.

  • Prerequisite: TBA
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSIE 421 Social Entrepreneurship (2 credits)▼

An increasing number of talented, ambitious individuals around the world, out of their concern for the varied problems faced by humanity, are trying to solve these problems; some at a local level, some at an international level. Social entrepreneurship is about such people, what their organizations do, how they function and what challenges they face. The course aims to introduce students to the concept, theories and cases of social entrepreneurship which is an emerging field about how business and non-business leaders design, build and manage mission-driven enterprises. It will help students understand how social entrepreneurs help deliver solutions when markets and governments fail to do the same.

  • Prerequisite: TBA
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSIE 430 Performance Evaluation and Impact Measurement (2 credits)▼

This course covers the use of both quantitative and qualitative data in evaluating performance and measuring social impact at both organizational and programmatic levels, as well as the application of decision-making models in improving the effectiveness of nonprofits. Students will also learn evaluation and assessment methods to develop organizational culture that embraces continuous improvement strategies.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 330 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): TAKA YOSHIOKA

DSIE 431 Nonprofit and Social Marketing (2 credits)▼

This course covers marketing principles, theories, and techniques and their application in nonprofit settings. In particular, students will learn social marketing as a tool for mission attainment of a nonprofit. Students will also explore how technology is used to advance the marketing and communication strategies of a nonprofit.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 330 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): TAKA YOSHIOKA

DSIE 432 Public Policy, Law, Advocacy, and Social Change (2 credits)▼

This course covers key public policy and legal framework that affect nonprofits as well as legal and tax implications related to nonprofit activities, including but not limited to giving, advocacy, lobbying, and any commercial activities of nonprofits. Students will also explore how individuals and nonprofits affect public policy or public opinions through such strategies as public education, policy research, community organizing, lobbying, and litigation.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 330 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): TAKA YOSHIOKA

DSIE 433 Managing Staff and Volunteers (2 credits)▼

This course covers principles of strategic human resources management and their use in a nonprofit context, and implications for recruitment, supervision, motivation, engagement, retention, and development of staff and volunteers. Students will learn strategies for advancing teamwork and group dynamics and the implications for organizational performance and mission attainment. Students will also understand the role, value, and dynamics of volunteerism in carrying out nonprofit work and fulfilling nonprofit missions.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 330 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): TAKA YOSHIOKA

DSIE 434 Social Finance and Fundraising (2 credits)▼

This course covers various forms of organized fundraising and resource development, including annual fundraising, planned and major giving, corporate fundraising, and special events for charitable giving, in addition to social investments. Students will learn important elements that are part of a comprehensive fund development process as well as ethical processes and practices of different fundraising strategies. Students will also explore generational and cultural differences in giving and implications for fundraising as well as trends in fundraising approaches such as the role of on-line giving, the use of social media, and crowdsourcing strategies.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 330 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): TAKA YOSHIOKA

DSIE 455 Statistical Analysis for Social Sciences (2 credits)▼

In this course, students will further study multivariate regression analysis with a main focus on ordinary least squares (OLS) regression. Topics include hypothesis testing, heteroskedasticity, omitted variable bias, measurement error, and topics related to model specification. Students will use SPSS or Stata (a statistical software application) to develop their data analysis skills.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 355 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): TAKA YOSHIOKA

DSCI 411 Seminar on Foundation of Mathematical Science (1 credit)▼

In this course, students will systematically learn mathematical analysis by reading textbooks, solving exercise questions, giving presentations and making discussions. One or some of the following topics will be covered: Polynomials, Abstract algebra, Real analysis, Complex analysis, Probability theory, Topology of smooth manifolds, Nonnegative matrix theory, Differential equations and applications, Fundamentals of numerical methods and programming, etc.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): FUTOSHI HAYASAKA

DSCI 412 Seminar on Applied Mathematical Science (1 credit)▼

In this course, students will systematically learn elements of applied mathematics by reading textbooks, solving exercise questions, giving presentations and making discussions. One or some of the following topics will be covered: Polynomials, Computational algebra, Real analysis, Complex analysis, Differential equations, Probability theory, etc.

  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TORU SASAKI

DSCI 415 Seminar on Computational Science (1 credit)▼

In this course students will systematically learn elements of computational science by reading textbooks, solving exercises, giving presentations and making discussions. Some of the following topics will be covered: numerical methods and algorithms for systems of linear equations, differential equations, optimization and integration; simulation, visualization and so on.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): WATARU SAKAMOTO, TAKASHI ISHIHARA

DSCI 416 Seminar on Statistical Science (1 credit)▼

In this course students will systematically learn elements of statistical science by reading textbooks, solving exercises, giving presentations and making discussions. Some of the following topics will be covered: Data arrangement, Probability distribution, Sampling distribution, statistical inference (estimation and test), etc.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): WATARU SAKAMOTO

DSCI 420 Molecular Spectroscopy (1 credit)▼

Molecular spectra are produced by molecular interaction with electromagnetic wave. They reflect electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels of molecules, and provide the fingerprints of molecules. In this course, students will learn how to understand molecular spectra of various molecules.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 421 Spectroscopic Methods (1 credit)▼

For observing molecular spectra, many spectroscopic methods are applied. Especially, laser spectroscopic techniques have been developed to observe high resolution molecular spectra in high sensitivity or fast time-scaled molecular spectra for molecular dynamics. In this course, principles for various spectroscopic methods will be presented.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 422 Introduction to Astrochemistry and Atmospheric Chemistry (1 credit)▼

Astrochemistry is an academic discipline that studies the chemical elements and molecules in the universe, especially focusing on their interaction with radiation. Atmospheric chemistry is a branch of atmospheric science that studies the chemistry of the Earth’s atmosphere and that of other planets. In astrochemistry and atmospheric chemistry, molecular spectroscopy is a particularly important experimental tool. In this course, fundamental understanding on both astrochemistry and atmospheric chemistry is introduced and the application of spectroscopy is presented. Although this course requires some knowledge on molecular spectroscopy, it can also be taken as an independent unit by interested students.

  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 425 Case Studies for Molecular Spectroscopy (1 credit)▼

Atmospheric environmental molecules, such as SOx and NOx, can be either normal stable molecules or transient unstable molecules with short lifetimes. Different molecular structures with various types of vibrational and rotational motions give various molecular spectra, or fingerprints, which can be used for the analysis and monitoring of the environments. Studies on several typical environmental molecules will be presented in this course.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 420 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 430 Biomass and Bioenergy (2 credit)▼

The course of Biomass and Bioenergy will cover the following topics: renewable feedstocks, their production, availability and attributes of biofuel/bioenergy production; types of biomass derived fuels and energy; thermochemical conversion of biomass to heat, power and fuel; biochemical conversion of biomass to fuel; environmental aspects of biofuel production; economics and life-cycle analysis of biofuel; value adding of biofuel residues; case studies on biofuel production.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 431 Advanced Catalysis (2 credit)▼

Advanced Catalysis is a practically-oriented course designed to teach students the fundamentals and application of catalysts and processes utilized in the chemical, petroleum, environmental and alternative energy industries. The course will review the fundamental principles of kinetics, characterization, and preparation of catalysts. Emphasis will be placed on processes for the industrial production of hydrogen, petroleum products for conventional transportation fuels, commodity and specialty chemicals, polymers, and alternative sources of energy using catalysts, biomass conversion to fuels.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 331 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 432 Heat and Mass Balances (1 credit)▼

An environmentally friendly chemical process should be analyzed by using two principles: equilibrium and kinetics of state change. Heat and mass balances which are based on the energy and mass conservation laws, respectively, are associated with the above principles. In this course, the calculation methods of heat and mass balances are introduced under the following conditions: batch and flow operations, steady and unsteady flow operations, exothermic, endothermic and adiabatic conditions, complicated process involving multiple reaction and separation plants, etc. Some calculation drills are also programed.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSCI 433 Environmental Process Engineering (1 credit)▼

When designing a process of producing materials and energy, it is important for the process to have low-impact on the environment. This course covers some of the following subjects, which are important for providing environment-suitable process: concept of mass balance, diffusion, and unit operation in chemical processes.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YUKITAKA KIMURA

DSCI 434 Recycling Engineering (1 credit)▼

Recycling methods of wastes are classified into 3 types, that is, material recycle, chemical recycle, and thermal recycle. In the first half of this course, the lecturer introduces waste recycling methods from the viewpoint of engineering. And in the second half, the students will survey various issues of waste recycling, not only as a technical problem, but also as an economic or political problems in their own countries or regions. The results of the survey are presented in the class. Through the discussion, appropriate choice of recycling method will be explored for the establishment of a sound-resource recycling society.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TOKURO NANBA

DSCI 435 Process Systems Engineering (1 credit)▼

This course will cover the following topics: Fundamental analysis of transport phenomena based on the balance equation of mass, heat, and momentum; Unit operations in chemical process; Safety and stability of chemical process; Process intensification. We will also survey the essence of chemical engineering science to design the chemical process based on the balance equation.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TOSHINORI SHIMANOUCHI

DSCI 436 Ceramics Science for Renewable Energy Utilization (1 credit)▼

This class will explain the fundamentals of ceramics to utilize solar energy. In particular, TiO2 photocatalyst surfaces, which exhibit interesting self-cleaning property, will be explained as an example of widely used environmentally friendly materials. In addition to the recent studies about TiO2-based self-cleaning surfaces, bio-inspired unique materials for self-cleaning surfaces will be explained in this class.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): SHUNSUKE NISHIMOTO

DSCI 437 Glass Science for Resource Recycling (1 credit)▼

This course will cover the fundamentals of materials science and chemistry of inorganic glasses focusing on environmental issues in industrial setting, including energy and resource saving issues. Students will learn a series of material cycles of manufacturing, evaluating and utilizing the material’s functions, and recycling the resource, based on fundamental inorganic chemistry and solid state chemistry. In the experimental part of this course, students will experience the preparation of glass samples in a laboratory.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YASUHIKO BENINO

DSCI 438 Functional Organic Materials Chemistry (1 credit)▼

In this course, students will learn photo chemistry, which results from the absorption of light, and the extraordinary influence of light on chemical behaviors. The course will cover the principles and applications of photochemistry from both a physical chemistry and organic chemistry angle. The latest developments in photochemistry, such as organic solar cell, photodynamic therapy applied to cancer, photoreaction, and photochromatic imaging, will be presented in this course.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TOMOYUKI TAJIMA

DSCI 439 Structure and Properties of Biodegradable Polymer (1 credit)▼

This course provides the fundamental knowledge of structure and properties of biodegradable polymers such as poly (L-lactic acid) and naturally occurring polymers. Students will learn the primary structure of polymeric materials, how to determine the molecular weight of polymers, statistical treatment of chain molecules, solution properties, thermal properties and solid state physics of polymers. This course also deals with the historical introduction and the recent application of biodegradable polymers.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): SHINICHI YAMAZAKI

DSCI 441 Conservation and Utilization of Water Resources (2 credits)▼

Local water resource is defined by the volume of water available in a typical year, which is generally determined by the difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration. It varies temporally and spatially, differs in quality and is affected by the global climate change and human activities. The course provides a hydrological overview to understand water resources such as water budget, water cycle and other water issues related watershed sciences.

  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KENJI OKUBO

DSCI 442 Environmental Issues and Recycling Processes of Resources (2 credits)▼

This course provides a basic understanding of the solid waste management, and the transition of the energy security policies of major countries. 1. Solid waste management: The basic concept of solid waste management and 3R promotion, definition of solid waste, waste generation and characteristics, waste collection and transport, and technologies and systems for waste treatment and landfill will be lectured. 2. Energy security: Currently each country is carrying out various measures to strengthen their energy security that are based on factors such as their respective resource endowments, and energy industry structures. The lecture aims to show the direction of the energy policies from the viewpoint of geological disposal of radioactive waste related to nuclear power plants.

  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YASUHIRO MATSUI

DSCI 461 Analytical Chemistry (1 credit)▼

This course uses the textbook Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry. Students will learn the core knowledge and concepts in general chemistry by discussing the fundamental subjects such as atoms and bonds by which a molecule is composed of, mass balance and reaction rate by which a chemical reaction is described. In this course, lecturers, who conduct their research in the field of Agrochemical Biosciences, cover the early chapters of the volume. The curriculum starts with remedial-level of chemistry with limited use of physics and mathematics. The emphasis is rather on the basic concepts and principles of chemistry with a relatable context to ensure students of all disciplines gain an appreciation of chemistry’s significance in everyday life.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAKASHI TAMURA

DSCI 462 Organic Chemistry (1 credit)▼

This course uses the textbook Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry. Students will learn the basic knowledge and framework of organic chemistry by discussing the characteristics of hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, and organic acids. In this course, lecturers, who conduct their research in the field of Agrochemical Biosciences, cover the middle chapters of the volume. Students will learn college-level organic chemistry with an aim to be familiarized with chemical structures and skills to draw chemical information underneath the structure of molecules.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HIROMASA KIYOTA

DSCI 463 Biological Chemistry (1 credit)▼

This course uses the textbook Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry. Students will learn the essential knowledge and ideas for biological chemistry by learning the practical subjects such as lipids, amino acids, and proteins. The topics also involve enzymes, vitamins, and nucleic acids, with which dynamic metabolism and genetic inheritance occur in cells. In this course, lecturers, who conduct their research in the field of Agrochemical Biosciences, cover the latter chapters of the volume. Students will learn college-level biological chemistry, and will understand the significance and potential of chemistry in understanding the mechanism of life.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YOSHIYUKI MURATA

DSCI 471 Introduction to Forest Ecosystem Science (1 credit)▼

Forest Ecosystem Science covers a wide range of subjects in forest ecosystems relating to physiological ecology, population and community ecology, soil science, biogeochemistry etc. It also covers interactions between forest ecosystems and human society. This class provides topics in Forest Ecosystem Science including ecosystem concept and elemental cycles, regeneration mechanisms of forest ecosystems and the conservation, food web structure, ecophysiology of trees against drought stress, and economic evaluation of forests’ multifunctional role.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

DSCI 472 Economics, Management and Technology Progress in Japanese Agriculture (1 credit)▼

Japan developed many agricultural machines along with the development of manufacturing industries after the World War II. If the farms were in good conditions, a couple can cultivate 10 hectares of rice paddies. But, in recent years, the food self-sufficiency rate has become almost 40 % in Japan. Is this a problem? The goal of this course is to find a problem and to come up with your own solution for it. Some general problems will be presented and the solutions from various fields, i.e., Economics, Management and Technology, will be introduced. We will discuss what was solved in the past, what should be solved at present, and the various approaches for the future.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

DSCI 473 Ecological Approach to Sustainable Agriculture (1 credit)▼

The goal of this course is to understand fundamentals of ecological approach to sustainable agriculture. It includes nutrient dynamics in soil-plant ecosystems, systematics and conservation of molluscs, ecological evolutionary studies on insect population, ecological genetics and entomology. The course also introduces soil managements, taxonomic approaches, genetic ecological approaches, applied entomology, evolutional ecology and behavioral ecology. The student will learn the overview of the current status of ecological approach to sustainable agriculture and its related issues.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

DSCI 481 Vegetables and Flower Science (1 credit)▼

Vegetables and flowers are essential crops in human life. They were selected from the wild plants which had the origin in all parts of the world and have been improved. The efficient and sustainable production of these crops is a significant challenge. The productions have been achieved by scientific understandings of the crops and improvements of cultivation technology. This course introduces scientific knowledge of vegetables and flowers, including their origins, physiological and ecological characters, cultivation techniques and usages.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TANJURO GOTO

DSCI 482 Plant Disease and Control (1 credit)▼

With a rising population, an integrated system of plant production must be sufficient to feed us now and in the near future. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) suggests that more than 800 million people in the world do not have enough to eat, causing 24,000 people to die from hunger. Actually, plant diseases annually cause a 20% yield loss in food and cash crops. This class explores the past, present and future of the plant pathology to achieve sustainable global food production.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KAZUHIRO TOYODA

DSCI 483 Fruit Science (1 credit)▼

This class covers the basics and applied aspects of fruit science, such as physiology, technology and marketing system. Major topics of fruit physiology are mechanisms of flowering, fruit growth, development and ripening, including control by plant hormones. Topics covered in this class include: technologies enabling seedless grape berries and high quality fruits with large and beautiful appearance and excellent flavors; year-round fruit providing systems using various cultivars, production and storage technique; and history and cultural aspects of fruit production in Japan.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YASUTAKA KUBO

DSCI 484 Crop Genetics and Breeding (1 credit)▼

Plant breeding is fundamental to improving crop productivity for food security. This class starts with introductory lectures on plant genetics including topics on Mendelian Genetics, linkage and molecular genetics. Subsequently, several topics related to plant breeding will be provided from foundational/theoretical and to applied perspective.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KENJI KATO

DSCI 485 Crop Science and Production (1 credit)▼

This lecture provides the basics and advanced knowledge of challenges to crop production. The goal of this lecture is to study ways to improve the yield and quality of products based on the understanding of the relationship between plant growth and field environment.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YOSHIHIKO HIRAI

DSCI 491 Animal Production Science (1 credit)▼

This course deals with the basics of fundamental animal science, with fundamental animal production related with reproduction, physiology, anatomy, and genetics. The goals of this course are to obtain basic knowledge about the animal reproduction, understand the relationship between structure and functions from the viewpoint of different animals (cow, pig and chicken etc.), and understand the theory and method for genetic improvement of domestic animals.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): NOBORU SAITO

DSCI 492 Food and Nutrition Science (1 credit)▼

The main subjects of this course are nutrition, food processing, and preservation, as well as food security and safety. This course deals with the fermentation processes using lactic acid bacteria for preserving and improving functional properties of animal products (milk, dairy products, and egg). This course also deals with t microbiota, obesity, and disease related with food and nutrition.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 390 or permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): HIDETOSHI MORITA

DSCI 493 Animal Life Science (1 credit)▼

Animals have abilities to adapt to the environmental changes and maintain internal homeostasis. Animals also reproduce a series of life. These events in the life are caused by the various mechanisms. This course deals with: 1) Animal physiology; exposition about the protective mechanisms from the pathogens, 2) Animal reproduction and development; physiology of reproduction and manipulation of embryos, 3) Animal breeding and genetics; genetic constitutions of animals and populations.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TOSHIMITSU HATABU

500 Level (Practicum)

 

DCOR 501 Study Abroad (2 credits)▼

When you study abroad, you can earn 2 credits, by completing the following tasks: (1) Preparing for your study abroad, including the planning of your course of study; (2) Sharing your activities and experiences on-line during your stay at a school you study at; and (3) Reflecting and reporting your experiences after you come back to Japan.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): DISCOVERY FACULTY

DCOR 590-598 Independent Study I-VIII (1~8 credit(s))▼

Independent study course involves conducting a term-long project under the supervision of a faculty member. Typically, such projects include student-driven research, literature review, or other form of creative project. Independent study is permitted only in special circumstances in which proposed learning is not possible in courses already offered by the Discovery Program, and upon an endorsement of a supervising faculty.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): DISCOVERY FACULTY

DCUL 501 Ethnographic Fieldwork (2 credits)▼

Ethnographic fieldwork is the bread-and-butter of sociological and anthropological research. It is a qualitative research method involving an extended engagement with a location and individuals. In this course, students conduct mini-ethnographic fieldwork. Students are required to write a proposal, conduct a field research, and write a report based on their experience. The format of the report can vary. Consult your instructor for further details on the requirements.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG, HARUNA MIYAGAWA, TAK UESUGI

DSIE 511/512 Career Workshop I/II (1 credit/ea.)▼

  • In these courses, students will learn from professionals in the business and nonprofit sectors how to improve job-seeking skills and career development strategies, so that they can become more competitive in the job market in the future.
  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSIE 551 Internship (1~8 credit(s))▼

From the 2nd year onwards all students can pursue internships at various small and large companies, nonprofits and the government offices within and outside Japan. Students are required to attend the pre-internship career workshop and to receive an approval from their Academic Advisor or Senior Project Advisor before commencing the internship. Students can earn a maximum of 8 credits by pursuing multiple internships in the course of their 4-year degree program. Credits are awarded based on a weekly log of work done, internship report and evaluation submitted by the organisation.

  • Prerequisite: AA’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): YUAN YUAN GONG, TAKA YOSHIOKA

DSCI 543 Laboratory in Water Management (1 credit)▼

In this laboratory course for water flow mechanism, irrigation and drainage, students observe hydraulic phenomena by using a number of experimental devices such as experimental open channel and experimental pipeline system, and understand the hydraulic mechanism of these phenomena. Hydraulic jump, flow over weir and flow under the gate are typical examples of these phenomena of open channel flow, and Venturi effect, flow velocity distribution, and friction loss head are those of closed conduit flow. The students will understand fundamental hydraulic principle governing water flow by analyzing the results of the hydraulic experiments, which is important for designing drainage and irrigation system.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HIDETAKA CHIKAMORI

DSCI 544 Laboratory in Environmental Biology (1 credit)▼

The purpose of this laboratory course is to acquire the methods and learn the procedures for analyzing the relationships between general environmental factors (e.g., light, temperature, water environment) and the ecological aspects of life stage, distribution and behavior in plant and aquatic animals.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YOSHITAKA NAKASHIMA, KAZUYOSHI NAKATA

DSCI 545 Laboratory in Environmental Soil Science (1 credit)▼

Soil is regarded as one of the environmental resources along with air and water. This experimental course covers the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils, such as particle size, water content, hydraulic conductivity and nitrogen concentration. The characteristics of soils are evaluated through laboratory experiments and field survey.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YASUSHI MORI, KUMIKO TSUJIMOTO

DSCI 546 Laboratory in Soil and Concrete Mechanics (1 credit)▼

To understand mechanical characteristics of construction materials such as soils and concretes is necessary to achieve safe and economical constructions of civil structures. This laboratory course provides the basics of laboratory experiments on soil and concrete materials from the viewpoint of engineering. Through some laboratory experiments in this course, students can learn how to evaluate physical/mechanical characteristics on the materials.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TOSHIFUMI SHIBATA, TAKAYUKI SHUKU

DSCI 549 Community Development in Asia (2 credits)▼

This course is designed to provide a comparative perspective on rural sustainability in Japan. Through field trips (full-day field trips on weekends) to rural areas in Okayama Prefecture and nearby, we focus on community development. Topics of field trips covered in this course are various dimensions of community development such as depopulation, revitalization of rural economy, and local governance of common resources. The main agenda will be to empower the local people for sustainable rural development. Students will develop their research skills on field survey, oral presentation, and group discussion. We welcome students who are interested in field trips or social research. Though the main topics of this course are related to social sciences and humanities, we strongly encourage students to develop interdisciplinary perspectives, including both natural and social sciences. Make sure to attend the first class, because the schedule will be arranged in consultation with students then. Field trips will be held on the weekends.

  • Prerequisites: NONE (JAPANESE PROFICIENCY IS NECESSARY)
  • Instructor(s): DOO-CHUL KIM, FUMIKAZU UBUKATA, YASUAKI KUKI, YASUKO HONDA

DSCI 561・562・563 Laboratory in Agrochemical Bioscience 1/2/3▼

This is a laboratory course on physico-chemistry, organic chemistry, and biological chemistry including microbiology. It aims to develop skills in carrying out experiments in a wide variety of branches in Agrochemical Biosciences with safety and efficiency. Students are expected to acquire necessary skills and knowledge needed for their Senior Project research. The course starts with the fundamental skills such as solvent extraction, buffer preparation, and then organic synthesis and the product identification. Biochemical subjects include protein extraction, fractionation by salting out and further analysis using electrophoresis. Additionally, students will learn kinetic analysis of the catalytic function of enzymes. Microbiological practice allows students to be familiar with the skills in isolating and growing useful microorganisms. In the latter part of the course, students will also learn genetic engineering skills.

  • Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

DSCI 571・572・573・574・575・576・577・578 Laboratory in Environmental Ecology 1-1 /1-2 /2-1 /2-2 /3-1 /3-2 /4-1 /4-2 (8 credits)▼

1) In this course students learn about the structure of Japanese agriculture and cultivate the abilities required to do a statistical analysis of data. 2) Topics covered in this course are observation of tissues and organs of tree species, analysis of the physiological functions, observation of forest soil and trees, and practice for management of artificial forests. 3) This class is composed of two parts: 1) utilization of basic tools to conduct a performance test of agricultural machines, and 2) control using computer algorithm. 4) The following topics are included in this lab course: sampling of small animals such as insects and molluscs from the university campus and Handa-yama experimental forest, specimen preparation, identification, population density estimation, and heritability estimation.

  • Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

DSCI 581・582・583 Laboratory in Applied Plant Science 1/2/3 (6 credits)▼

The course provides laboratory experiments of the basic techniques related to Plant Science and Molecular Biology, such as microscope operation to observe plant cells and micro-organisms, cross-pollination and pathogen-inoculation, nucleic acids and proteins extraction, and molecular biological analysis. It also provides the basic techniques related to Plant Science, Horticultural Science, and Crop Science, such as soil diagnosis, growth and physiological analysis of crops, compositional analysis of crops, and anatomical observation of crops.

  • Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

▼DSCI 591・592・593・594・595・596 Laboratory in Animal Science 1-1 /1-2 /2-1 /2-2 /3-1 /3-2 (6 credits)

1) Reproduction is a fundamental issue for the production/breeding of animals. To develop a better understanding of animal reproduction, this course is designed to experience genetic analysis, handling of germ cells and embryos. 2) Laboratory course about animal physiology, genetics and behavior. Objective of this course is to acquire the basic technique for analysis of animal physiology, genetics and behavior, and to apply it to various research areas. 3) Laboratory course for practical training on animal experimentation and animal food analysis. Objective of this course is to acquire proper knowledge and technique for treatment of experimental animals and analysis of animal foods.

  • Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): Faculty of Agriculture

600 Level (Senior Project) 

 

DCOR 601-608 Research Seminar (1~8 credit(s))▼

Through research seminars, students will start narrowing down on the topics and research methods in preparation for the Senior Project. Each instructor will run the seminar differently, so take the first half of your third year to explore with whom you wish to work on your Senior Project by attending more than one research seminars.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): DISCOVERY FACULTY

DCOR 650 Applied Writing and Research Skills (1 credit)▼

Application of research skills introduced in DCOR 250, with increased emphasis on internet and electronic resources. Students will complete short, high-interest projects individually or in groups, and present findings to the class via multi-media formats.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DCOR 699 Senior Project (10 credits)▼

Senior Project is an opportunity for you to highlight your finding (or discovery!). If you choose the Discovery Track, you will complete your Senior Project in English supervised by a Discovery Faculty. We encourage you to start thinking what you want to do for your Senior Project early on. While some writing component is necessary, you may propose an alternative medium for the main portion of your Senior Project. For example, you may choose to produce visual products, such as video, photos, and art pieces if you consider these mediums can better represent your work, along with short essays. If you choose the Matching Track, follow the protocol of the department in which you pursue your Senior Project. For both tracks, students are expected to present their project in English before graduation.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): DISCOVERY FACULTY