Courses

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100 Level

 

DCOR 100 Discovery Guidance▼

This course introduces the curriculum overview of the Discovery Program as well as its components. The following items are introduced: 1) A variety of courses and the expertise of faculty members for the Discovery Track, 2) Nine Faculties where they can complete their Senior Project for the Matching Track.

  • Prerequisite: NONE

DCUL 140 Current Political Events (1 credit)▼

This course examines current political events. The class collectively will choose a couple of political events in which they are interested. Then, by mostly using news articles, students will gather factual information about these events and explain why they occurred. By taking this course, students will learn how to find information about political events and analyze them academically and systematically. No prior knowledge of political science is necessary.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s):  KIMIKO OSAWA

DSIE 110 Principles of Management (1 credit)▼

This course introduces the principles and functions of management in business organizations.  It discusses the roles, functions and activities of management, i.e. planning, organizing, leading and controlling.  By the completion of the course, students will understand that management is an on-going process geared to motivate the worker as an individual and as a member of a group.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YUAN YUAN GONG

DSIE 121 Introduction to Development Studies (1 credit)▼

This course will examine the development discourse in the postwar period. The course is designed for the students who wish to work in the fields of international development or international business in the future. Other students who are willing to obtain basic knowledge in development are encouraged to attend as well. Through the in-class discussions and research project, students will have opportunities to gain in-depth understanding of the development issues in selected countries in the Asia-Pacific or in other regions.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSCI 110 Introductory Mathematics I (1 credit)▼

This is an introductory course in mathematics which will cover subjects including algebra, trigonometry, logarithm, probability and statistics.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 111 Introductory Mathematics II (1 credit)▼

This is a remedial course on mathematics at the pre-college level, which includes trigonometry, vectors, sequences, calculus, and statistics.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s):  JIAN TANG

DSCI 130 Introductory Chemistry (1 credit)▼

This course introduces the core concepts and principles in chemistry at a foundation level. Topics that may be covered are: Matter, elements, atoms and ions, atomic and electronic structure, bonding and molecular structure, intermolecular associations, states of matter, gas laws, solutions, and acids and bases.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 145 Fundamentals of Earth Science (1 credit)▼

This is an introductory course focusing on Earth and Planetary Sciences. Topics include formation of planets, evolution of planetary atmosphere, geochemistry of the Earth’s continental crust, and human impact on the environment.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KATSUYUKI YAMASHITA

DSCI 155 Basic Biology (1 credit)▼

In this course, students learn fundamental concepts and basic knowledge in a broad range of biological research field including biochemistry, structural biology, biophysics and molecular biology.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): MICHIHIRO SUGA

DEAP 159 Advanced English Skills for Discovery Students (1 credit)▼

This is a Required course for Discovery-Track students. A specific cohort is targeted each time the course runs (see online syllabus). The course aims to strengthen students’ writing by reviewing basic principles of academic writing and conventions, developing students’ skills in finding and selecting outside sources, and introducing the key components of an academic paper/thesis.

  • Prerequisite: See online syllabus
  • Instructor(s): ANDREA TAN GEOK POH

200 Level

 

DCOR 201 Discovery Seminar I (1 credit)▼

Discovery Seminar I will explore what it means to learn in a university setting among a diverse group of people. Inter-cultural communications, team building, information literacy, constructive criticism, and mutual respect will be covered.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG, YUAN YUAN GONG, YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DCOR 202 Discovery Seminar II (1 credit)▼

Discovery Seminar II provides students with opportunities to learn and exercise important academic skills and activities such as presentation, discussion, and group work. The course will be taught by multiple instructors each with a specialization in diverse fields of philanthropy, physical chemistry, chemistry, and political science.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s):  JIAN TANG, KIMIKO OSAWA, EIKO USHIDA

DCOR 203 Discovery Seminar III (1 credit)▼

Discovery Seminar III will be taken concurrently with your Senior Project (DCOR 699). You will revisit the beginning when each of you first arrived at the Discovery Program, and share the journey of your academic career as well as the prospects for the post-graduation with your peers. It is also an occasion for you to prepare for your Senior Project presentation.

  • Prerequisite: DCOR 201: Discovery Seminar I and DCOR 202: Discovery Seminar II
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA, TAK UESUGI, UDDIN MD. AZHAR, TAKA YOSHIOKA

DCUL 211 Feminist Ethnic Studies (3 credits)▼

Japan ranked 121st out of 153 countries in the 2020 Global Gender Gap Report compiled by the World Economic Forum. In addition, the false assumption of ethnic homogeneity is prevalent. Yet, gender and ethnic diversity is an asset to overcome economic stagnation. How can each one of us take a step to realize gender and ethnic equality? This anthropological course emulates fieldwork; Learning, thinking, and acting are essential.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 216 Korean Diaspora (3 credits)▼

About three million foreigners live in Japan. You or your friend may be one of them. Koreans used to be the largest “foreign” community in Japan. Its long history and rich livelihood offer insights to succeed in cross-cultural and multi-ethnic settings. While learning from Koreans in Japan and beyond, pay attention to many other ethnic groups. This anthropological course emulates fieldwork; Learn, think, and act accordingly.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 220 Sociological Imagination (2 credits)▼

This is an introductory course on sociology. What does it mean to “think sociologically”? Students will be introduced to sociological perspectives and insights as we read a novel and engage in discussions.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 225 Global Sociology (3 credits)▼

This is a foundational course on sociology from a global perspective. Students will be introduced to basic sociological concepts, theories, and methods, while being attentive to the global forces such as rapid and intensified movements and exchanges of goods, capital, people, and ideas that affect the realms of economy, civic life, arts and sciences, and technology.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 230 Culture and Illness (2 credits)▼

This is an introductory course in medical anthropology. It examines cross-cultural issues in medical practices and the consequences of the expansion of western medicine on the ideas of who we are.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 233 Anthropology of Disaster (2 credits)▼

This course examines how local cultures affect disaster vulnerability and responses, as well as how certain phenomena are recognized as “disasters,” and open up the space for new development dreams as well as further marginalization.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 236 Anthropology of Food (3 credits)▼

This course examines the relationship between culinary culture (and “taste”) and identities, and explores the possibilities of alternative futures through food.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 230 Culture and Illness OR DCUL 233 Anthropology of Disaster
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 240 Introduction to Politics (3 credits)▼

This is an introductory course for the study of politics through the lens of political science. Starting with the discussion of what politics is, this course examines fundamental building blocks of political systems such as states, regime types, governing institutions, electoral systems, political ideologies and cultures, and major actors such as political parties and interest groups. Students will also learn major concepts and theories of political science. No prior knowledge of political science is necessary.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DCUL 241 Introduction to Japanese Politics (1.5 credits)▼

This is an introductory course for the study of Japanese politics and examines Japanese political history since the Meiji Restoration, major political institutions and actors, and contemporary political topics. By taking this course, students will understand how Japanese politics has developed, how major political institutions work, how major political actors operate within the institutional settings, and major contemporary issues that Japanese politics is facing. Students are also encouraged to develop skills to analyze Japanese politics objectively by using concepts/theories of political science. No prior knowledge of Japanese history or politics is necessary.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DSIE 212 Topics in Management I (1.5 credit)▼

This course is related to organizational behaviors, which is concerned with explaining, predicting, and enhancing the effectiveness of individuals and groups in work organizations. It focuses on the individual level of phenomenon and provides students with a general sense of management issues related to people within the organization. The course will cover topics such as emotions and moods, and communication.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YUAN YUAN GONG

DSIE 216 Topics in Management II (1.5 credit)▼

This is an introductory course to Human Resources Management (HRM). It provides students with a general sense of the job of a human resources manager as well as various HRM functions such as selection, compensation, training & development and performance management.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YUAN YUAN GONG

DSIE 218 Topics in Management III (1.5 credit)▼

This course is related to organizational behaviors, which is concerned with explaining, predicting, and enhancing the effectiveness of individuals and groups in work organizations. This course will focus on interpersonal differences and cover topics such as personality and values, attitudes, and perceptions.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 212 Topics in Management I
  • Instructor(s): YUAN YUAN GONG

DSIE 219 Topics in Management IV (1.5 credits)▼

This course is related to organizational behaviors, which is concerned with explaining, predicting, and enhancing the effectiveness of individuals and groups in work organizations. This course will focus on individual decision making, such as the mechanisms and biases in everyday decision-making activities.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 212 Topics in Management I
  • Instructor(s): YUAN YUAN GONG

DSIE 220 Introduction to Microeconomics (1.5 credits)▼

Some of us face questions like “Why are rents higher in some cities? What price should I charge for the English lessons that I give?  How many years should I spend in school? Should I take up a part-time job?”
This course will help answer such questions through basic economic concepts. Introduction to Microeconomics will explain the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, including both consumers and producers within the economic system. Important topics include supply and demand, trade theory, elasticity, externalities and firm behavior. 

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSIE 225 Introduction to Macroeconomics (1.5 credits)▼

Macroeconomics is the study of the whole economy. The goal of macroeconomics is to explain theories and phenomena such as booms and recessions, unemployment, inflation etc. that affect all households, firms and markets in the economy. This course will help students understand the reasons behind changing prices, the differences in income levels across countries, how governments promote a rise in incomes and stabilize employment. The important topics include GDP and its measurement, Consumer Price Index, Banks and Money Supply, Money Growth and Inflation.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSIE 231 Philanthropy and Nonprofit Organizations (2 credits)▼

This course provides an introduction to philanthropy and nonprofit organizations. Through this course, students will study the concept of philanthropy, patterns of giving and volunteering, and the definition, distinctive features, and various roles of nonprofit organizations. Also, students will understand the diverse forms of philanthropic action.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAKAYUKI YOSHIOKA

DSIE 232 Global Philanthropy and Comparative Nonprofit Sectors (2 credits)▼

In this course, students will explore the scope, structure, and financing of nonprofit sectors in various countries as well as the historical development and recent trends of those nonprofit sectors. In addition, students will learn about various roles and functions of nonprofit organizations from political, social, and economic perspectives. Also, students will study the relationship between the government, nonprofits, and businesses across a variety of countries.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 231 Philanthropy and Nonprofit Organizations
  • Instructor(s): TAKAYUKI YOSHIOKA

DSIE 250 Introduction to Data Analysis (1 credit)▼

This course introduces students to descriptive and inferential statistics often used in social sciences. The course aims to provide students with a solid foundation for analyzing data, and conveying analyses in convincing and appropriate ways. Topics covered include variables and types of data, frequency distributions and graphs, data description, and probability and counting rules.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TAKAYUKI YOSHIOKA

DSCI 210 Mathematics for Physical Chemistry (1.5 credits)▼

This course will introduce students to various basic mathematical methods used in physical chemistry. The methods involve error analysis, probability and statistics, linear algebra, vectors and matrices, first and second order differential equations and their solution.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 220 Modern Physics (1.5 credits)▼

In this course, students will learn college-level physics with moderate use of mathematics. The emphasis will be on the concepts and principles of modern physics. Contents include electromagnetic wave, relativity, quantum theory, atom and molecule, and nucleus and elementary particle.   

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 230 Chemistry for Chemical Engineering (1.5 credits)▼

Chemistry for Chemical Engineers provides background in the topics of mass and energy balances specific to chemical engineering. This course will help students understand the chemical reactions and relate them to the main themes of mass and energy balances.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 211 Fundamentals of Mathematics (1 credit)▼

In this course, the following topics are covered: complex numbers and Euler’s form, vectors and tensors, matrices and determinants, series and limits, differential equations, and statistics.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s):  JIAN TANG

DSCI 221 Fundamentals of Physics I (1 credit)▼

In this course, classical mechanics including kinematics and dynamics of motion, work and energy, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational motion and torque, and oscillations and waves from a high-school level to a college level will be covered.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 222 Fundamentals of Physics II (1 credit)▼

In this course, classical physics on thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, and optics from a high-school level to a college level will be covered.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 223 Quantum Physics and Atomic Structure (1 credit) ▼

Atoms are observed through atomic spectra, which can be described by the energy levels of atoms with the use of quantum mechanics. In this course, students will learn the general principles of quantum mechanics, energy levels for hydrogen atom and multi-electron atoms, and atomic spectra.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 224 Introduction to Thermodynamics (1 credit)▼

This course will introduce you to the basics of thermodynamics. It contains important concepts such as the relationship between mechanical energy and thermal energy and the law of conservation of energy. Related physical terms will be explained in English and Japanese.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): MICHINOBU MINO

DSCI 225 Chemical Bond and Molecular Structures (1 credit)▼

Molecular structures or geometric shapes are determined by the molecular bonds, which result from the molecular electronic structures. Molecules with various structures are classified into several types. Accordingly, several types of energy levels are shown for the molecular rotational and vibrational motions in the electronic states. In this course, students will learn point group theory, and different types of electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels for various molecular structures.  

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 231 Fundamentals of Chemistry (1 credit)▼

Studies in fundamental chemistry deal with a range of fundamental concepts that can be used to explain various phenomena in chemistry, materials science and biology. The courses have been designed to provide students who have an interest in chemistry with the necessary knowledge and skills to undertake further studies in chemistry or pursue alternative pathways in the biological, environmental, earth and physical sciences. Fundamental chemistry focuses in the areas of stereochemistry, synthesis, properties and reactions of molecules, thermodynamics, kinetics and the principles of organic chemistry.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 232 Instrumental Analysis (1 credit)▼

The course will address the fundamental principles and applications of modern instrumental analysis relevant for chemical engineering and industrial chemistry. The subject consists of a series of interrelated lectures and tutorials. The analytical techniques covered in this course will range from spectroscopy, chromatography, electro-analytics, thermal analysis, to mass spectrometry. The lecture components will address the underpinning physical principles of each analytical technique in-detail and also include an introduction to statistical data analysis. At the completion of the course, the student will have developed a firm understanding of the analytical methods employed in his or her field of study and also gained experience in carrying out analytical experiments.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 233 Introduction to Catalytic Chemistry (1 credit)▼

This introductory course in homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis will examine a number of catalytic reactions and their mechanism and process conditions. It will cover the preparation of catalysts and their use in specific chemical processes. Students will also learn how to analyze the data obtained from a catalytic reaction and how it can be used to determine the mechanism.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): UDDIN MD. AZHAR

DSCI 255 Genetics and Molecular Biology (1.5 credits)▼

This lecture is about basics of biology. The basics are discussed with recent insights. Hopefully, we will have small experiments in the lecture.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): AKIRA SATO

DSCI 260 Introduction to Agricultural Sciences (1.5 credits)▼

In this course, students will learn about current issues related to food supply, bio-resources, bio-technology, and conservation of the environment. This course also introduces the basics of agricultural science and other related scientific fields that can be applied to resolve these problems.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DEAP 251 Introduction to the use of English (1.5 credits)▼

The course aims to introduce students to English for Academic Purposes (EAP) by developing their skills in paragraph writing and working on language.

  • Prerequisite: Follow placement advice. See online syllabus, especially ‘Target Students’.
  • Instructor(s): ANDREA TAN GEOK POH

DEAP 252 Intermediate English at University (1.5 credits)▼

The course aims to develop students’ skills in English for Academic Purposes (EAP) by developing their skills in essay-writing and introducing them to the idea of academic integrity and use of outside sources.

  • Prerequisite: Follow placement advice. See online syllabus, especially ‘Target Students’. Pay attention to the course number when registering.
  • Instructor(s): ANDREA TAN GEOK POH

DEAP 253 English Seminar (1 credit)▼

The course aims to develop students’ skills in participating in and facilitating group discussions at the university level. Through various practices, it develops students’ abilities to engage with unit lectures and integrate relevant research in group discussions.

  • Prerequisite: See online syllabus, especially ‘Target Students’
  • Instructor(s): ANDREA TAN GEOK POH

DAJP 291 Academic Japanese Training I (1 credit)▼

Development of academic study skills and learning strategies needed to successfully complete Japanese-medium content courses offered by other departments/faculties outside the Discovery program through self-reflection and individual consultation. Students will explore learning strategies that best fit their own Japanese language proficiency and learning styles, identifying problems and find solutions.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): EIKO USHIDA

DAJP 292 Academic Japanese Training II (1 credit)▼

Application of academic study skills and learning strategies explored in DJAP291 through self-reflection and individual consultation. Students will gain confidence in taking Japanese-medium content courses offered by other departments/faculties outside the Discovery program the rest of the school year.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): EIKO USHIDA

DAJP 293 Career Japanese (1 credit)▼

Preparation for Japanese-Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) N2 which is necessary for most international students to look for a job in Japan. Students will improve Japanese language proficiency, test skills, and learning strategies to pass JLPT N2 through multiple practice tests, self-reflection and monitoring of own learning, and analysis of the JLPT.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): EIKO USHIDA

300 Level

 

DCUL 310 Cultural Anthropology (3 credits)▼

Question the common sense in order to have in-depth cross-cultural experiences. Cultural Anthropology helps and navigates you through this exhilarating path. Self-reflexivity, open-mindedness, flexibility, and ability to cope with unpredictability are required in addition to maturity, responsibility, and punctuality.

  • Prerequisites: DCUL 211: Feminist Ethnic Studies OR DCUL 216: Korean Diaspora
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 316 Topics in Japan and Beyond (3 credits)▼

Through selected topics, you deepen your understanding of Japan and beyond. Like most Professor Chung’s courses, this course emulates anthropological fieldwork. Self-reflexivity, open-mindedness, flexibility, and ability to cope with unpredictability are required in addition to maturity, responsibility, and punctuality.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 211: Feminist Ethnic Studies OR DCUL 216: Korean Diaspora
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 320 Sociology of Migration I (2 credits)▼

This course will introduce theories of migration through ethnographies. Topics include (but are not limited to) the mechanisms and the decision-making processes of migration, gender, generation, social networks, and transnational ties. We will explore how the act of migration and the presence of “migrants” challenge the existent boundaries – both physical and symbolic – in the host society as well as in the society of origin.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 225 Global Sociology
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 321 Urban Sociology (2 credits)▼

An urban setting is a site of human actions, interactions, and inactions. They occur in the structures of society that are bound not only by physical space but by class, gender/sexuality, race, religions, and ethnicity. In this course, we will explore how history and culture interact with a place, define the rhythm of life, and influence the destiny of individuals by referring to empirical studies from around the world.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 225 Global Sociology
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 323 Logic and Methods of Social Inquiry (3 credits)▼

The course will guide students from simple curiosity to scientific inquiry. Conducting a study involves continuous dialogues between the researcher and the study participants, the “data,” and the literature, as well as him/herself. Students will not only learn the basic research methods used in the social sciences (sociology in particular), but more importantly, how research methods are used to generate scientific knowledge and why they are an integral component of social science research. We will also bring ethics of engaging in research at the center of our discussion.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 225 Global Sociology
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 325 Sociology of Migration II (2 credits)▼

This course will introduce theories of migration through ethnographies. Topics include (but are not limited to) the mechanisms and the decision-making processes of migration, gender, generation, social networks, and transnational ties. We will explore how the act of migration and the presence of “migrants” challenge the existent boundaries – both physical and symbolic – in the host society as well as in the society of origin.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 225 Global Sociology
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 327 History of Social Thought (2 credits)▼

In this course, students will be introduced to philosophers and social theorists from the past and present. We will draw insights from the social sciences (e.g. sociology, anthropology, history, etc.) as well as various arts including architecture, literature, film, and painting.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 225 Global Sociology
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 330 Medical Anthropology (2 credits)▼

This course examines how different societies around the world conceptualize health and illness differently, and how the contemporary alliance of western medicine and the state is creating a particular kind of experiences, subjectivity, and citizenship.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 230 Culture and Illness.
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 333 Environmental Anthropology (3 credits)▼

This course examines how societies around the world conceptualize and engage with their environments, and how global capitalism and environmentalism are giving rise to new problems, possibilities, and “cosmo”-politics.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 230 Culture and Illness OR DCUL 233 Anthropology of Disaster OR DCUL 236 Anthropology of Food
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 340 Comparative Politics (1.5 credits)▼

This course examines how politics works in different countries, trying to understand why we see similarities and differences in their political processes and dynamics. For example, we will discuss varieties we can find in democracies, non-democracies, welfare systems, relationships between politics and religion, types of political parties, and citizens’ political participation patterns. While there are some overlaps of topics with Introduction to Politics, this course will examine these topics in more depth and analyze different countries as cases.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 240 Introduction to Political Science
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DCUL 344 Japanese Politics (2 credits)▼

This course examines various aspects of contemporary Japanese politics by reading and discussing the academic research on Japanese politics, mainly in the field of political science. By taking this course, students will obtain knowledge and skills to understand and analyze Japanese politics. They can also gain knowledge of concepts and theories of political science.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 241 Japanese Politics
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DCUL 346 International Politics (1.5 credits)▼

This course examines the modern history of international politics and then the dynamics and mechanisms of international politics. By focusing on how actors interact with each other within sets of institutions, we will discuss why countries engage in wars and why countries care about international human rights and the global environment. Students can also gain knowledge of concepts and theories of political science.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 240 Introduction to Political Science
  • Instructor(s): KIMIKO OSAWA

DSIE 312 Topics in Management V (2 credits)▼

This is an advanced HRM course that is designed to provide both a conceptual and practical study of human resource planning and staffing within organizations. Upon completing the course, the students will be able to develop an integrative framework and activities of HR planning and strategic staffing in an organization in accordance with the business strategies.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 216 Topics in Management II
  • Instructor(s): YUAN YUAN GONG

DSIE 316 Topics in Management VI (2 credits)▼

This course focuses on how individuals, groups, organizations, and the surrounding environment interact and affect organizational effectiveness. Students are expected to understand the complex interplay of these multi-level effects is important in enhancing the effectiveness of the role as a manager (or manager-to-be) in managing subordinates, peers, and supervisors and contributing to organizational effectiveness. The course will cover topics such as Foundations of Group Behavior, Work Teams.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 218 Topics in Management III OR DSIE 219 Topics in Management IV
  • Instructor(s): YUAN YUAN GONG

DSIE 318 Topics in Management VII (2 credits)▼

This course examines leadership theory and research, and emphasizing the development of leadership and interpersonal skills through self-assessment case analysis, and experiential exercises.  Important fields within personnel management and human resource management, such as recruitment, working environment and health, are also discussed.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 312 Topics in Management V OR DSIE 316 Topics in Management VI
  • Instructor(s): YUAN YUAN GONG

DSIE 319 Topics in Management VIII (2 credits)▼

Training & Development helps change employees’ attitude towards work and towards the organization.  It helps enhance employees’ knowledge to embrace the changing environments. In this course, we will discuss various issues in T&D, for example, the relationship between training and strategy, training needs assessment, training methods/skills, and cross-cultural issues in training.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 312 Topics in Management V OR DSIE 316 Topics in Management VI
  • Instructor(s): YUAN YUAN GONG

DSIE 320 Microeconomics (2 credits)▼

Building on Introduction to Microeconomics (DSIE 210), this course will help students understand the decisions made by producers and consumers in different market structures like monopolies, oligopolies, competitive markets. For e.g.: “How is the market for oil different from the market for diamonds?” Other topics covered would be design of the tax system, theory of consumer choice and asymmetric information.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 220 Introduction to Microeconomics OR permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSIE 323 Development Economics (2 credits)▼

Over a billion people survive on less than a dollar a day. These in turn constitute the malnourished, illiterate, unemployed and unorganized labor as poverty severely limits people’s capabilities and well-being. This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the problems that developing countries face and the diversity in the developing world. The course will be based on the Human Capital approach to development and will focus on the economics of the central issues in the developing world today like poverty, population, child mortality, hunger, migration and environmental degradation etc. Students will learn the nature and causes of these problems and the appropriate policy design to address them.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 220 Introduction to Microeconomics AND DSIE 225 Introduction to Macroeconomics, OR permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSIE 325 Macroeconomics (2 credits)▼

Applying the basic concepts studied in Introduction to Macroeconomics (DSIE 215), this course delves deeper into economy-wide issues like “How should governments fight recessions? How are inflation and unemployment related?” Exchange rates, financial systems, balance of payments, government debt, monetary and fiscal policies are some of the topics included.

  • Prerequisites: DSIE 225 Introduction to Macroeconomics OR permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSIE 327 Japanese Economy (2 credits)▼

This course presents an overview of the Japanese economy. It will discuss some of the past and present features, persistent problems and challenges faced by this economy. Japan’s post war high growth rate, national income and savings, the lifelong employment system, current unemployment and irregular employment trends, Abenomics, current demographic challenges and sluggish growth rate, high public debt are some of the topics to be included.

  • Prerequisites: DSIE 220 Introduction to Microeconomics AND DSIE 225 Introduction to Macroeconomics, OR permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSIE 328 Japanese Economy and Gender (2 credits)▼

Japan, the world’s third-largest economy, has been placed at near the bottom in the gender equality rankings. In addition to persistent gender inequality, income inequality among households is on the rise. Trickle-down effects of economic growth have weakened; why? In this course, students will learn about the labor market, business practices and relevant economic and social policies in Japan through a gender lens and discuss the ways to advance sustainable development. Through individual research and in-class discussion, students will have opportunities to apply the similar gender analysis to other countries and discuss the case of Japan as a comparative study.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 220 Introduction to Microeconomics AND DSIE 225 Introduction to Macroeconomics, OR permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSIE 321 International Economics (2 credits)▼

Changes in international trade volumes and exchange rates are not just newspaper headlines. They affect our lives when we purchase imported goods or travel abroad. This course aims to provide students with a good theoretical background to study international trade policies, international monetary systems, and international finance.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 220 Introduction to Microeconomics AND DSIE 225 Introduction to Macroeconomics, OR permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSIE 331 Nonprofit Management and Social Entrepreneurship (4 credits)▼

This course is designed to provide current and future nonprofit leaders and social entrepreneurs with an overview of a range of nonprofit management and social entrepreneurship issues, methods, and practices. Topics covered include strategic planning and management, leadership, board governance, financial management, human resource management, marketing, program evaluation, advocacy, and accountability.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 231 Philanthropy and Nonprofit Organizations AND DSIE 232 Global Philanthropy and Comparative Nonprofit Sectors
  • Instructor(s): TAKAYUKI YOSHIOKA

DSIE 350 Elementary Statistics (4 credits)▼

This course introduces students to inferential statistics often used in social sciences. The course aims to provide students with a solid foundation for elementary statistics. Topics covered include discrete probability distributions, the normal distribution, confidence intervals and sample size, hypothesis testing, testing the difference between two means, two proportions, and two variances, correlation and regression, other chi-square tests, analysis of variance, and nonparametric statistics. Students will use Excel, SPSS, or Stata (a statistical software application) to develop their data analysis skills.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 250 Introduction to Data Analysi
  • Instructor(s): TAKAYUKI YOSHIOKA

DSIE 351 Qualitative Research Methods (2 credits)▼

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of qualitative research methods, such as case study research and survey methodology. Through this course, students will learn how to design case study research and collect and analyze data for case study research. Students will also study how to design and implement internet, phone, mail, and mixed-mode surveys.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 250 Introduction to Data Analysi
  • Instructor(s): TAKAYUKI YOSHIOKA

DSCI 326 Fundamentals of Molecular Spectroscopy (2 credits)▼

Molecular spectra are produced by molecular interaction with electromagnetic wave. They reflect electronic, vibrational, and rotational energy levels of molecules, and provide the fingerprints of molecules. In this course, students will learn how to understand molecular spectra of various molecules.

  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 327 Spectroscopic Methods (1 credit)▼

For observing molecular spectra, many spectroscopic methods are applied. Especially, laser spectroscopic techniques have been developed to observe high resolution molecular spectra in high sensitivity or fast time-scaled molecular spectra for molecular dynamics. In this course, principles for various spectroscopic methods will be presented.

  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 328 Introduction to Astrochemistry and Atmospheric Chemistry (1 credit)▼

Astrochemistry is an academic discipline that studies the chemical elements and molecules in the universe, especially focusing on their interaction with radiation. Atmospheric chemistry is a branch of atmospheric science that studies the chemistry of the Earth’s atmosphere and that of other planets. In astrochemistry and atmospheric chemistry, molecular spectroscopy is a particularly important experimental tool. In this course, fundamental understanding on both astrochemistry and atmospheric chemistry is introduced and the application of spectroscopy is presented. Although this course requires some knowledge on molecular spectroscopy, it can also be taken as an independent unit by interested students.

  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Instructor(s): JIAN TANG

DSCI 329 Introduction to Solid State Physics (2 credits)▼

Solid-state physics introduces the basics of electrical conduction and magnetic properties. Electrons play an important role there. You will also learn the basics of quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics.

  • Prerequisites: NONE
  • Instructor(s): MICHINOBU MINO

DSCI 350 Basic Physics Laboratory (1 credit)▼

This course will introduce students to use experimental equipment and understand the basic concepts of physics through various experiments. The main experimental themes are planned to be gravitational acceleration, refraction and polarization of light, interference and diffraction of ultrasonic waves.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): MICHINOBU MINO

DSCI 353 Laboratory in Analytical Chemistry (2 credits)▼

This laboratory course in analytical chemistry aims to provide basic knowledge and skills for conducting chemical experiments. Analytical chemistry is composed of qualitative and quantitative characterization of substances. In this course, students will learn various methods for measuring substances and biological materials at molecular level. Furthermore, students will learn the skills for safety management of chemical substances, which are indispensable in further research in the third and fourth years including the research for Senior Project.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSCI 355 Laboratory in Biology (2 credits)▼

Through a series of observation and analysis, students will understand the basics of structures and functions of plants, animals, and microbes. The subjects dealt in this laboratory course includes: 1. Observation of mammalian oocyte, 2. Observation of external and internal plant morphology, 3. Experiment on insects – collection and specimen, 4. Field research on suburban forest, 5. Observation of plant genetics, 6. Plant growth analysis, 7. Observation of gastrointestinal and fermentation microbes, 8. Observation of hemocytes.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSCI 357 Basic Field Practice (2 credits)▼

This course deals with the basic practical training of agriculture at the Field Science Center including Okayama Farm, Tsudaka Livestock Farm, and Hachihama Farm. Students will experience the work in the agricultural field, and learn a basic cultivation and animal feeding techniques of field crops, horticultural crops, and beef cattle. This course also enhances the development of student’s skills in farm work.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSCI 360 Introduction to Agrochemical Bioscience (1 credit)▼

Agricultural Bioscience originated from a branch of applied sciences mainly specialized in processing raw agricultural products into foods and beverages. Now this branch has extended its applications to fields such as medical innovations and the improvement of natural environment in accordance with the advancement of modern civilization. In this course, students will learn topics and stories related to the Agricultural Bioscience, which has contributed to human society especially in the field of health, food, and environment. Students will also learn the wealth of organic chemistry and biochemistry, by which novel biological functions are elucidated with rationale and logics of science.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YOSHIMASA NAKAMURA

DSCI 370 Introduction to Environmental Ecology (1 credit)▼

The goal of this course is to understand fundamental concepts of sustainable agricultural production and environmental conservation from the viewpoints of ecology, engineering, and socio-economics. The course provides topics related to the following fields of study: Physiological Plant Ecology, Forest Ecology, Environmental Soil Science, Conservation of Aquatic Biodiversity, Insect Ecology, Evolutionary Ecology, Bioproduction Systems Engineering, Resources Management, and Farm Management Systems and Information Processing.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): HISASHI DATAI

DSCI 381/382 Introduction to Applied Plant Science I/II (1 credit each)▼

This course offers an introductory lecture series regarding the production of both crops and horticulture crops. It deals with following topics: characterization and genetic improvement of useful crop traits, diseases and immunity mechanisms in plants, cultivation management techniques for maximum production, and technologies for transportation and preservation of farm harvests.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YOSHIHIKO KUBO

DSCI 390 Introduction to Animal Science (1 credit)▼

The goal of this course is to understand fundamentals of animal science including physiology, anatomy, reproduction, breeding, genetics, nutrition, and microbiology. The course also introduces animal biotechnology, animal model for human diseases, assisted reproductive technology, and relation between food and human health. The student will learn overview of current status of animal science and related issues.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): NAOKI NISHINO

400 Level

 

DCUL 410 Topics in Japan and Beyond II (3 credits)▼

Through selected topics, you deepen your understanding of Japan and beyond. Like most Professor Chung’s courses, this course emulates anthropological fieldwork. Self-reflexivity, open-mindedness, flexibility, and ability to cope with unpredictability are required in addition to maturity, responsibility, and punctuality.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 310: Cultural Anthropology OR DCUL 316: Topics in Japan and Beyond I
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 413 Sex Work and Emotional Labor (3 credits)▼

What is sex work? What is emotional labor? How do sex workers and emotional laborers produce themselves and manage their businesses? And why and how do customers pursue these services? We respond to these questions at the intersection of sex work, emotional labor, and possibly spiritual care. Self-reflexivity, open-mindedness, flexibility, and ability to cope with unpredictability are required in addition to maturity, responsibility, and punctuality.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 310: Cultural Anthropology OR DCUL 316: Topics in Japan and Beyond I
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 433 Colonialism and War (3 credits)▼

Colonialism and war are deeply related. Colonization often happens before/during/after wars. Do you know which parts of the world Japan colonized? When and how did colonization occur and end at all? What are the (post-)colonial effects on the colonizers and colonized? If you wish for a peaceful world, it is necessary to learn colonialism and war. Self-reflexivity, open-mindedness, flexibility, and ability to cope with unpredictability are required in addition to maturity, responsibility, and punctuality.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 310: Cultural Anthropology OR DCUL 316: Topics in Japan and Beyond I
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG

DCUL 421 Globalization and Development (2 credits)▼

Taking a critical approach to the world of international development, this course will explore the premises and goals of various actors involved in development projects through case studies. We will focus on the narratives of international development, and underlying forces that impact development, and its unintended consequences on the lives of people.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 320 Sociology of Migration I or DCUL 325 Sociology of Migration II
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 423 Gender in Global Context (2 credits)▼

will explore how gender plays out in the lives of individuals and interacts with other aspects of our identity, reinforcing our social roles and positions in society. Through memoirs and biographies of both women and men, we will examine how gender influences pursuits of individuals with a close attention to the socioeconomic and political context.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 320 Sociology of Migration I or DCUL 325 Sociology of Migration II
  • Instructor(s): HARUNA MIYAGAWA

DCUL 430 Seminar in Medical Anthropology (2 credits)▼

This is a special topics course in medical anthropology.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 330 Medical Anthropology
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 431 Ethnographies in Medical Anthropology (2 credits)▼

In this course, students apply conceptual understandings gained in DCUL 330 Medical Anthropology to read book-length ethnographies and write their own research paper.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 330 Medical Anthropology
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 435 Anthropology of Science (2 credits)▼

This course introduces social scientific and philosophical approach to natural sciences, and explores how anthropologists conduct ethnographies of scientific practices.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 330 Medical Anthropology OR DCUL 333 Environmental Anthropology
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 438 Anthropology of Memory (4 credits)▼

This course is about personal and collective memory of violence and trauma. By exploring the intersections of psychological discourse and literary/ethnographic works on trauma, we ponder upon the question of justice and responsibility for past atrocities.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 330 Medical Anthropology
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 439 Anthropology of the Self (4 credits)▼

This course explores the question “What is the self?” by examining the cases in which the confidence in one’s sense of self crumbles through conflicting ethical values, mental illnesses, and abjection.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 330 Medical Anthropology
  • Instructor(s): TAK UESUGI

DCUL 440/441/442/443 Topics in Political Science I/II/III/IV (2 credits each)▼

This course examines a specific political issue in depth. Details will be described in the syllabus.

  • Prerequisite: DCUL 240 Introduction to Political Science
  • Instructor(s):  KIMIKO OSAWA

DSIE 412 Topics in Management IX (2 credits)▼

This course is designed to expand students’ understanding of negotiations through theories such as social judgment, social cognition, and decision making, etc. Students will learn how to analyze their negotiation experiences based on the theories and experience various negotiations on class.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 312 Topics in Management V OR DSIE 316 Topics in Management VI
  • Instructor(s): YUAN YUAN GONG

DSIE 416 Topics in Management X (2 credits)▼

This is a course introducing the applications of various theories in OB and HRM in contemporary organizations and society. Students will analyze a variety of real-world examples and case studies.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 312 Topics in Management V OR DSIE 316 Topics in Management VI
  • Instructor(s): YUAN YUAN GONG

DSIE 420 Introduction to Feminist Economics (2 credits)▼

This course will introduce feminist economics and assumes that the students have some basic knowledge of economics. Specific topics include heteronormativity in economics, feminist approaches to economics research, the role of caring labor in the economy, feminist approaches to economic development, intrahousehold relationships, gender and property rights, differential effects of international trade and finance by gender, and feminist approaches to public finance and social welfare.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 220 Introduction to Microeconomics AND DSIE 225 Introduction to Macroeconomics, OR permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSIE 421 Trade Policy and Development (2 credits)▼

This course will introduce the recent developments in international trade and monetary policy. International trade agenda now includes flows of goods, services, money, and people (temporary migrant workers) as well as trade-related investment and intellectual property rights. How does the global and regional integration affect people’s lives? We will examine the WTO and regional trade agreements and their impacts on human development by examining case studies.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 220 Introduction to Microeconomics AND DSIE 225 Introduction to Macroeconomics, OR permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSIE 422 Poverty (2 credits)▼

What is poverty? Who are the poor? What are the causes of and solutions to poverty? How do we measure poverty? How much poverty exists? Is a world free of poverty possible? In this course, we will examine poverty in the context of the history of economic thought and examine various poverty measures, and anti-poverty policies and programs. The discussions in this course are applicable to both high-and low-income economies.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 220 Introduction to Microeconomics AND DSIE 225 Introduction to Macroeconomics, OR permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSIE 423 Inequality (2 credits)▼

Inequality, like poverty, is multidimensional. How does the history, the political and economic system, or technology affect inequality? How has the inequality within and among countries changed over the past decades? Should we care about inequality of outcome or of opportunity? In this course, we will examine inequality in the context of the history of economic thought and examine various inequality measures, and possible causes of and solutions to inequality. The discussions in this course are applicable to both high-and low-income economies.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 220 Introduction to Microeconomics AND DSIE 225 Introduction to Macroeconomics, OR permission of instructor
  • Instructor(s): YUMIKO YAMAMOTO

DSIE 436/437/438 Nonprofit Management and Social Entrepreneurship Practicum I/II/III (4 credits each)▼

These practicum courses provide students with training in specific professional skill sets, such as program evaluation and performance management, social marketing, nonprofit advocacy and public policy, social finance and fundraising, and nonprofit human resource management. Course projects, case study analysis, and discussions are designed to offer students plenty of practical opportunities to advance their management and analytical skills, leadership, and entrepreneurial mindset.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 331 Nonprofit Management and Social Entrepreneurship
  • Instructor(s): TAKAYUKI YOSHIOKA

DSIE 450 Intermediate Statistics (4 credits)▼

In this course, students will further study multiple regression analysis with a main focus on ordinary least squares (OLS) regression. Topics include hypothesis testing, heteroskedasticity, omitted variable bias, measurement error, and topics related to model specification. Students will use SPSS or Stata (a statistical software application) to develop their data analysis skills.

  • Prerequisite: DSIE 350 Elementary Statistics
  • Instructor(s): TAKAYUKI YOSHIOKA

DSCI 461 Agrochemical Bioscience 1 – Analytical Chemistry (1 credit)▼

This course uses the textbook Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry. Students will learn the core knowledge and concepts in general chemistry by discussing the fundamental subjects such as atoms and bonds by which a molecule is composed of, mass balance and reaction rate by which a chemical reaction is described. In this course, lecturers, who conduct their research in the field of Agrochemical Biosciences, cover the early chapters of the volume. The curriculum starts with remedial-level of chemistry with limited use of physics and mathematics. The emphasis is rather on the basic concepts and principles of chemistry with a relatable context to ensure students of all disciplines gain an appreciation of chemistry’s significance in everyday life.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 360 Introduction to Agrochemical Bioscience
  • Instructor(s): TAKASHI TAMURA

DSCI 462 Agrochemical Bioscience 3 – Organic Chemistry (1 credit)▼

This course covers principles of strategic human resources management and their use in a nonprofit context, and implications for recruitment, supervision, motivation, engagement, retention, and development of staff and volunteers. Students will learn strategies for advancing teamwork and group dynamics and the implications for organizational performance and mission attainment. Students will also understand the role, value, and dynamics of volunteerism in carrying out nonprofit work and fulfilling nonprofit missions.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 360 Introduction to Agrochemical Bioscience
  • Instructor(s): HIROMASA KIYOTA

DSCI 463 Agrochemical Bioscience 2 – Biological Chemistry (1 credit)▼

This course uses the textbook Fundamentals of General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry. Students will learn the essential knowledge and ideas for biological chemistry by learning the practical subjects such as lipids, amino acids, and proteins. The topics also involve enzymes, vitamins, and nucleic acids, with which dynamic metabolism and genetic inheritance occur in cells. In this course, lecturers, who conduct their research in the field of Agrochemical Biosciences, cover the latter chapters of the volume. Students will learn college-level biological chemistry, and will understand the significance and potential of chemistry in understanding the mechanism of life.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 360 Introduction to Agrochemical Bioscience
  • Instructor(s): TADAYOSHI KANAO

DSCI 471 Introduction to Forest Ecosystem Science (1 credit)▼

Forest Ecosystem Science covers a wide range of subjects in forest ecosystems relating to physiological ecology, population and community ecology, soil science, biogeochemistry etc. It also covers interactions between forest ecosystems and human society. This class provides topics in Forest Ecosystem Science including ecosystem concept and elemental cycles, regeneration mechanisms of forest ecosystems and the conservation, food web structure, ecophysiology of trees against drought stress, and economic evaluation of forests’ multifunctional role.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 370 Introduction to Environmental Ecology
  • Instructor(s): MUNETO HIROBE

DSCI 472 Economics, Management and Technology Progress in Japanese Agriculture (1 credit)▼

Japan developed many agricultural machines along with the development of manufacturing industries after the World War II. If the farms were in good conditions, a couple can cultivate 10 hectares of rice paddies. But, in recent years, the food self-sufficiency rate has become almost 40 % in Japan. Is this a problem? The goal of this course is to find a problem and to come up with your own solution for it. Some general problems will be presented and the solutions from various fields, i.e., Economics, Management and Technology, will be introduced. We will discuss what was solved in the past, what should be solved at present, and the various approaches for the future.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 370 Introduction to Environmental Ecology
  • Instructor(s): KAZUHIKO NAMBA

DSCI 473 Ecological Approach to Sustainable Agriculture (1 credit)▼

The goal of this course is to understand fundamentals of ecological approach to sustainable agriculture. It includes nutrient dynamics in soil-plant ecosystems, systematics and conservation of molluscs, ecological evolutionary studies on insect population, ecological genetics and entomology. The course also introduces soil managements, taxonomic approaches, genetic ecological approaches, applied entomology, evolutional ecology and behavioral ecology. The student will learn the overview of the current status of ecological approach to sustainable agriculture and its related issues.

  • Prerequisites: DSCI 370 Introduction to Environmental Ecology
  • Instructor(s): TAKAHISA MIYATAKE

DSCI 481 Vegetables and Flower Science (1 credit)▼

Vegetables and flowers are essential crops in human life. They were selected from the wild plants which had the origin in all parts of the world and have been improved. The efficient and sustainable production of these crops is a significant challenge.  The productions have been achieved by scientific understandings of the crops and improvements of cultivation technology. This course introduces scientific knowledge of vegetables and flowers, including their origins, physiological and ecological characters, cultivation techniques and usages.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 381 Introduction to Applied Plant Science I AND DSCI 382 Introduction to Applied Plant Science II
  • Instructor(s): TANJURO GOTO

DSCI 482 Plant Disease and Control (1 credit)▼

With a rising population, an integrated system of plant production must be sufficient to feed us now and in the near future. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) suggests that more than 800 million people in the world do not have enough to eat, causing 24,000 people to die from hunger. Actually, plant diseases annually cause a 20% yield loss in food and cash crops. This class explores the past, present and future of the plant pathology to achieve sustainable global food production.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 381 Introduction to Applied Plant Science I AND DSCI 382 Introduction to Applied Plant Science II
  • Instructor(s): KAZUHIRO TOYODA

DSCI 483 Fruit Science (1 credit)▼

This class covers the basics and applied aspects of fruit science, such as physiology, technology and marketing system. Major topics of fruit physiology are mechanisms of flowering, fruit growth, development and ripening, including control by plant hormones. Topics covered in this class include: technologies enabling seedless grape berries and high quality fruits with large and beautiful appearance and excellent flavors; year-round fruit providing systems using various cultivars, production and storage technique; and history and cultural aspects of fruit production in Japan.

  • Prerequisite: NONE
  • Instructor(s): YASUTAKA KUBO

DSCI 484 Crop Genetics and Breeding (1 credit)▼

Plant breeding is fundamental to improving crop productivity for food security. This class starts with introductory lectures on plant genetics including topics on Mendelian Genetics, linkage and molecular genetics. Subsequently, several topics related to plant breeding will be provided from foundational/theoretical and to applied perspective.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 381 Introduction to Applied Plant Science I AND DSCI 382 Introduction to Applied Plant Science II
  • Instructor(s): KENJI KATO

DSCI 485 Crop Science and Production (1 credit)▼

This lecture provides the basics and advanced knowledge of challenges to crop production. The goal of this lecture is to study ways to improve the yield and quality of products based on the understanding of the relationship between plant growth and field environment.

  • Prerequisites: DSCI 381 Introduction to Applied Plant Science I AND DSCI 382 Introduction to Applied Plant Science II
  • Instructor(s): YOSHIHIKO HIRAI

DSCI 491 Animal Production Science (1 credit)▼

Atmospheric environmental molecules, such as SOx and NOx, can be either normal stable molecules or transient unstable molecules with short lifetimes. Different molecular structures with various types of vibrational and rotational motions give various molecular spectra, or fingerprints, which can be used for the analysis and monitoring of the environments. Studies on several typical environmental molecules will be presented in this course.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 390 Introduction to Animal Science
  • Instructor(s): KOJI KIMURA

DSCI 492 Food and Nutrition Science (1 credit)▼

The main subjects of this course are nutrition, food processing, and preservation, as well as food security and safety. This course deals with the fermentation processes using lactic acid bacteria for preserving and improving functional properties of animal products (milk, dairy products, and egg). This course also deals with t microbiota, obesity, and disease related with food and nutrition.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 390 Introduction to Animal Science
  • Instructor(s): HIDETOSHI MORITA

DSCI 493 Animal Life Science (1 credit)▼

Animals have abilities to adapt to the environmental changes and maintain internal homeostasis. Animals also reproduce a series of life. These events in the life are caused by the various mechanisms. This course deals with: 1) Animal physiology; exposition about the protective mechanisms from the pathogens, 2) Animal reproduction and development; physiology of reproduction and manipulation of embryos, 3) Animal breeding and genetics; genetic constitutions of animals and populations.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 390 Introduction to Animal Scienc
  • Instructor(s): TOSHIMITSU HATABU

500 Level (Practicum)

 

DCOR 501 Study Abroad (2 credits)▼

When you study abroad, you can earn 2 credits, by completing the following tasks: (1) Preparing for your study abroad, including the planning of your course of study; (2) Sharing your activities and experiences on-line during your stay at a school you study at; and (3) Reflecting and reporting your experiences after you come back to Japan.

  • Prerequisite: Academic Advisor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): DISCOVERY FACULTY

DCOR 591 Independent Study (1~16 credit(s))▼

Ethnographic fieldwork is the bread-and-butter of sociological and anthropological research. It is a qualitative research method involving an extended engagement with a location and individuals. In this course, students conduct mini-ethnographic fieldwork. Students are required to write a proposal, conduct a field research, and write a report based on their experience. The format of the report can vary. Consult your instructor for further details on the requirements. 

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG, HARUNA MIYAGAWA, TAK UESUGI

DCUL 501 Ethnographic Fieldwork I/II/III (2 credits each)▼

Ethnographic fieldwork is the bread-and-butter of sociological and anthropological research. It is a qualitative research method involving an extended engagement with a location and individuals. In this course, students conduct mini-ethnographic fieldwork. Students are required to write a proposal, conduct a field research, and write a report based on their experience. The format of the report can vary. Consult your instructor for further details on the requirements. 

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): HAENG-JA CHUNG, HARUNA MIYAGAWA, TAK UESUGI

DSIE 551 Internship (1~8 credit(s))▼

From the 2nd year onwards all students can pursue internships at various small and large companies, nonprofits and the government offices within and outside Japan. Students are required to attend the pre-internship career workshop and to receive an approval from their Academic Advisor or Senior Project Advisor before commencing the internship. Students can earn a maximum of 8 credits by pursuing multiple internships in the course of their 4-year degree program. Credits are awarded based on a weekly log of work done, internship report and evaluation submitted by the organization.

  • Prerequisite: Academic Advisor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): TAKAYUKI YOSHIOKA

DSCI 561/562/563 Laboratory in Agrochemical Bioscience 1/2/3 (2 credits each)▼

This is a laboratory course on physico-chemistry, organic chemistry, and biological chemistry including microbiology. It aims to develop skills in carrying out experiments in a wide variety of branches in Agrochemical Biosciences with safety and efficiency. Students are expected to acquire necessary skills and knowledge needed for their Senior Project research. The course starts with the fundamental skills such as solvent extraction, buffer preparation, and then organic synthesis and the product identification. Biochemical subjects include protein extraction, fractionation by salting out and further analysis using electrophoresis. Additionally, students will learn kinetic analysis of the catalytic function of enzymes.  Microbiological practice allows students to be familiar with the skills in isolating and growing useful microorganisms. In the latter part of the course, students will also learn genetic engineering skills.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 360 Introduction to Agrochemical Bioscience AND Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSCI 571/572/573/574/575/576/577/578 Laboratory in Environmental Ecology 1-1/1-2/2-1/2-2/3-1/3-2/4-1/4-2 (1 credit each)▼

1) In this course students learn about the structure of Japanese agriculture and cultivate the abilities required to do a statistical analysis of data.
2) Topics covered in this course are observation of tissues and organs of tree species, analysis of the physiological functions, observation of forest soil and trees, and practice for management of artificial forests.
3) This class is composed of two parts: 1) utilization of basic tools to conduct a performance test of agricultural machines, and 2) control using computer algorithm.
4) The following topics are included in this lab course: sampling of small animals such as insects and molluscs from the university campus and Handa-yama experimental forest, specimen preparation, identification, population density estimation, and heritability estimation.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 370 Introduction to Environmental Ecology AND Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSCI 581/582/583 Laboratory in Applied Plant Science 1/2/3 (2 credits each)▼

The course provides laboratory experiments of the basic techniques related to Plant Science and Molecular Biology, such as microscope operation to observe plant cells and micro-organisms, cross-pollination and pathogen-inoculation, nucleic acids and proteins extraction, and molecular biological analysis. It also provides the basic techniques related to Plant Science, Horticultural Science, and Crop Science, such as soil diagnosis, growth and physiological analysis of crops, compositional analysis of crops, and anatomical observation of crops

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 381 Introduction to Applied Plant Science I AND DSCI 382 Introduction to Applied Plant Science II AND Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): TBA

DSCI 591/592/593 Laboratory in Animal Science 1/2/3 (2 credits each)▼

1) Reproduction is a fundamental issue for the production/breeding of animals. To develop a better understanding of animal reproduction, this course is designed to experience genetic analysis, handling of germ cells and embryos.
2) Laboratory course about animal physiology, genetics and behavior. Objective of this course is to acquire the basic technique for analysis of animal physiology, genetics and behavior, and to apply it to various research areas.
3) Laboratory course for practical training on animal experimentation and animal food analysis. Objective of this course is to acquire proper knowledge and technique for treatment of experimental animals and analysis of animal foods.

  • Prerequisite: DSCI 390 Introduction to Animal Science AND Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): TBA

600 Level (Senior Project) 

 

DCOR 601 Research Seminar (1~10 credit(s))▼

Through research seminars, students will start narrowing down on the topics and research methods in preparation for the Senior Project. Each instructor will run the seminar differently, so take the first half of your third year to explore with whom you wish to work on your Senior Project by attending more than one research seminars.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): DISCOVERY FACULTY

DEAP 650 Applied Language Skills for Discovery Students (1.5 credits)▼

This is a course for Discovery-Track students. A specific cohort is targeted each time the course runs (see online syllabus). The course aims to strengthen students’ skills in reading and writing academic papers/theses. It also addresses some common issues that students have with writing academic papers/theses. Please note that the course deals primarily with issues that involve language skills and writing conventions, not content knowledge or research design/skills.

  • Prerequisite: DEAP 159. The course instructor reserves the right to make the final selection of students based on consideration of several factors (enrolment limit applies). See online syllabus for details
  • Instructor(s): ANDREA TAN GEOK POH

DCOR 699 Senior Project (10 credits)▼

Senior Project is an opportunity for you to highlight your finding (or discovery!). If you choose the Discovery Track, you will complete your Senior Project in English supervised by a Discovery Faculty. We encourage you to start thinking what you want to do for your Senior Project early on. While some writing component is necessary, you may propose an alternative medium for the main portion of your Senior Project. For example, you may choose to produce visual products, such as video, photos, and art pieces if you consider these mediums can better represent your work, along with short essays. If you choose the Matching Track, follow the protocol of the department in which you pursue your Senior Project. For both tracks, students are expected to present their project in English before graduation.

  • Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission in advance
  • Instructor(s): Senior Project Advisor